Electric Low Capacity

Light Duty Commercial

Electric cement lined water heater Model E
  • Light Duty
  • 6 - 120 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 12KW - 1 Phase or 3 Phase

Ceiling Hung Horizontal

Electric horizontal ceiling hung water heater Model HE/HSE
  • Horizontal, Ceiling Hung
  • 20 or 30 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 20 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Heat Pump
Hybrid

Hybrid electric heat pump water heater Model PBX
  • Heat Pump Water Heater
  • 40 - 120 Gallon Capacity
  • 1 or 3 Phase

Point-Of-Use Storage

Point-of-use electric water heater Model CE110
  • Point-of-Use
  • 1 Gallon Capacity
  • 1000 or 450 Watts - 1 Phase

Point-Of-Use Tankless

Electric tankless point-of-use water heater Model R
  • Whole House / Point-of-Use
  • Availabe 3 thru 27 KW - 1 Phase

Electric
Booster

Electric booster water heater Model J
  • Booster Heater
  • Provides 180°F water
  • Up to 88 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Tankless Electric Booster

Electric tankless booster heater Model JTX
  • Tankless Booster Heater
  • Provides 180°F water
  • 11 to 54 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Heavy Duty Commercial

Commercial heavy duty electric storage water heater Model SE
  • Heavy Duty
  • 6-120 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 58 KW - 3 Phase

Tankless Commercial

Electric tankless water heater Model TX
  • Tankless Commercial
  • Highly efficient tankless
  • Up to 54 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Large ASME
Heater

Large capacity electric storage tank water heater Model SH
  • Large Capacity
  • 80-5000 Gallon Capacity
  • All KW ratings - 1 or 3 Phase
     

Commercial Gas Tankless

Gas tankless water heater Model GX
  • High Efficiency Condensing Burner
  • Integrated Pump
  • 200,000 and 250,000 BTUs

Integrated Tank with Tankless

Condensing gas storage tank water heater Model GXT
  • High Efficiency Condensing Burner
  • Hydrastone Cement
  • 200,000 to 250,000 BTUs

DI / RO Gas
Tankless

DI/RO gas fired tankless water heater Model DGX
  • DI/RO Water Heater
  • High Efficiency Condensing Burner
  • 199,950 and 250,000 BTU

Gas Tankless Booster

Condensing gas tankless booster water heater Model JBX
  • Gas Tankless Booster
  • For Commercial Kitchens
  • 150,000 / 200,000 / 250,000 BTU

Gas Storage
Heater

Condensing gas storage tank water heater Model GXT
  • Non Condensing Burner
  • Hydrastone Cement
  • 200,000 to 250,000 BTUs
   

Large ASME
Steam Heater

Steam fired water heater large capacity Model ST
  • Storage Type
  • 80-5000 Gallon Capacity
  • ASME Stamped

Packaged Semi-Instantaneous

Semi-Instantaneous Steam Fired Water Heater Model STX
  • Semi-Instantaneous
  • Space saving design
  • Provides 10,500 GPH

Point-Of-Use
Steam

Storage tank steam fired water heater Model PS
  • Light Duty
  • 80-120 Gallon Capacity
  • For low demand/recovery

High Capacity Instantaneous

Instantaneous steam fired water heater Model F
  • Instantaneous
  • 7 Sq. Ft. of floorspace
  • Up to 120 GPM
     

Semi-Instantaneous Indirect

Indirect fired semi-instantaneous water heater Hubbell Model BWX
  • Semi-Instantaneous
  • Vertical or Horizontal
  • ASME Stamped

Large ASME
Indirect

Indirect fired storage tank water heater Hubbell Model BW
  • Storage Type
  • Vertical or Horizontal
  • 80-5000 Gallon Capacity

Small Capacity Indirect

Indirect fired storage tank water heater model T Transflow
  • Indirect Fired
  • 30-120 Gallon Capacity
  • Utilizes boiler water

Solar

Solar water heater Model SLN
  • Solar Heater
  • Vertical Storage Type
  • 30-120 Gallon Capacity
       

Storage
Tanks

ASME and None ASME storage vessels Hubbell Model StorageTank
  • ASME & Non ASME designs
  • Hydrastone Cement
  • Vertical or Horizontal
     
       

Circulation (Instantaneous)

Electric circulation heater Hubbell Model CR
  • Circulation (Instantaneous)
  • Heavy Duty Construction
  • 25-1600 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Explosion
Resistant

Electric hazardous location water heater Model ER
  • Hazardous Location
  • 10-120 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 58 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Industrial Process Heater

Electric process industrial water heater Model V
  • Process Systems & Industrial
  • ASME Stamped
  • Up to 88 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Emergency Shower Tankless

Electric tankless safety shower water heater Model ETX
  • Tankless Emergency Tepid Water
  • NEMA 4 Standard
  • Up to 88 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

RO / DI Heater Compact

DI/RO electric hot water heater Model HD
  • RO/DI Water Heater
  • Point-of-Use Heater
  • Up to 88 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

RO / DI Heater Storage

DI/RO electric hot water heater Model D
  • RO/DI Water Heater
  • 1-120 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 88 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Tepid Water for Emergency Fixtures

Electric safety shower water heater Model EMV
  • Emergency Tepid Water
  • Fully packaged system
  • Integrated mixing valve

Fully Integrated Package

Model Packaged Skid
  • Customized to your specifications
  • Full featured system ready for your application

Light Duty
Electric

Electric water heater for shipboard marine use single phase power Model ME
  • Light Duty
  • 6-120 Gallon Capacity
  • Up to 6 KW - 1 Phase

Large ASME
Electric

Electric water heater for shipboard marine use large capacity Model MSH
  • Large Capacity
  • 80-5000 Gallon Capacity
  • All KW ratings - 1 or 3 Phase

Heavy Duty
Electric

Electric water heater for shipboard marine use three phase power Model MSE
  • Vertical
  • 6-120 Gallon Capacity
  • 1 or 3 Phase - Up to 58 KW

Tankless
Electric

Electric tankless water heater for shipboard marine use model MTX
  • Tankless Marine Heater
  • Provides 180°F water
  • 11 to 54 KW - 1 or 3 Phase

Naval

Naval shipboard marine electric water heater Hubbell Model 177
  • MIL Spec Navy Heaters
  • Comforms to MIL-H-965
  • Shock and EMI protection

Fully Integrated Package

Turn-key hot water system
  • Customized to your specifications
  • Full featured system ready for your application
   

Immersion Heating
Elements

Electric immersion tubular style heaters
  • Immersion Electric Heaters
  • Flanged or Screw Plugs Types
  • All KW ratings - 1 or 3 Phase

Heat Transfer
Coils

Heat exchanger and heating coil water heaters
  • Immersion Heat Transfer Coils
  • U tube type
  • Range of Materials
   
       
Electric High Capacity
Gas Fired
Steam Fired
Indirect
Storage
Special Purpose
Marine
Elements & Exchangers
Resource Center
Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

Where can I purchase a Hubbell water heater?

There are numerous ways to purchase a Hubbell water heater depending upon the model you desire and your geographic location. The easiest way is to contact Hubbell directly at 800-647-3165 and ask for the sales department where you will be directed to either our local representative or our order entry department for quick and easy ordering.

Where can I purchase replacement parts?

Parts are available for your Hubbell water heater direct from the factory. Please call 800-647-3165 and ask for our parts department. Please have your model and serial number handy.

I don't see the size or feature I need, what do I do?

Hubbell has more than 35 product families available in over 4,000,000 configurations. There are numerous features, configurations and ratings we provide but for practical reasons are are not listed in the sales brochure. If you have a specific requirement and you do not see it in the brochure, please contact a Hubbell Sales Engineer...chances are we have what you need.

What should I know about Legionella disease?

Legionella is the bacteria responsible for Legionnaire’s Disease, an acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract. This bacterium was first identified in 1977 by the Centers for Disease Control as the cause of an outbreak of pneumonia that caused 34 deaths at a 1976 American Legion Convention in Philadelphia. Pontiac Fever is a less severe, non-pneumonia, flu-like disease that is associated with and likely caused by Legionella bacteria. Legionella is a fairly common water bacterium and has been found to exist widely in many surface water sources including lakes, rivers, streams and ponds. It can also be found in ground water sources and some soils. At the levels found in these naturally occurring sources it typically does not pose a threat to public health. When the bacterium enters a domestic water system it can find an ideal host environment of warm water temperatures (105-115°F), stagnant water areas (isolated storage tanks and dead-end piping legs) and ample food sources (sediment, scale, deposits and biofilm). Under these conditions Legionella can rapidly colonize, forming higher concentrations that can pose the public health threat of Legionnaire’s Disease. There are many methods of controlling colonization of Legionella bacteria. However, a widely accepted and preferred method is to maintain the hot water system storage temperature continually at or above 140°F. Unfortunately, the elevated temperature necessary to minimize the growth of and kill Legionella bacteria has the potential to cause serious thermal shock and scalding injuries. As such, many plumbing engineers will specify that the water heater be set to maintain water temperatures at 140°F or higher to reduce the risk of Legionella, but then specify the appropriate mixing valve to ensure safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more thorough discussion of Legionella please go to here and the following link to the US Department of Labor OSHA information regarding Legionnaires’ Disease OSHA here

My question is not found in these FAQ’s, where do I look next?

Check out the Hubbell Product Center at Here for a complete listing of all technical documentation available by model. Get easy access to Installation, Operation & Maintenance manuals, Sales Brochures, Service Bulletins, Wiring Schematics, Parts Breakdowns and various other technical documents related to the full line of Hubbell water heaters. Or, if you prefer, please call us at 800-647-3165 and ask to speak to a Sales Engineer.

My T&P relief valve is dripping water, what does this mean?

A temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve is a safety device intended to relieve excessive pressure (typically >150psi) or excessive temperature (210°F/99°C). Typically, a dripping T&P is most likely the result of excessive pressure build up in the water heater. When a T&P opens due to excessive temperature, you will most likely see a significant amount of steam in the air as the water flashes into steam as it discharges from the T&P. A relief valve discharging due to excessive pressure is by far the most common reason for relief valve discharge. It is also worth noting that a T&P relief valve will begin to open when pressure is within 5% of its set pressure rating, as an example a 150psi relief valve will begin to open and “weep” at 142psi. See FAQ relating to thermal expansion for a more detailed discussion of this problem.

What code requirements are applicable for my installation?

The installation of water heaters are mostly governed by the Uniform Plumbing Code (or CPC in California), Uniform Mechanical Code, and National Electrical Code. These are standard codes that are used across the United States, and each state can amend them as they wish. To take it further, each city and county jurisdiction has assigned one or more building officials with what is called Administrative Authority. This "Authority" allows each jurisdiction the right to interpret the codes as they see fit. Because of this, many cities differ on their requirements. Hubbell strongly recommends that you contract with a plumbing engineer who knows and understands the intricacies of the building code requirements for your location.

What is thermal expansion and how does it affect me?

Thermal expansion is created when water in a hot water system expands due to increasing temperature. When there are no faucets/fixtures open to release the excessive pressure caused by the water being heated up, and if there is no expansion tank in the system to absorb the expanded water, then it is likely that the water heater T&P (temperature and pressure) relief valve will open slightly and begin to drip to release the excessive pressure. This is not a condition that the T&P relief valve is intended, it is a safety device not an operational device. Thermal expansion can be evident immediately upon a new installation when a cold system is first undergoing heat up, or even occur years in the future due to seemingly unrelated changes to the plumbing system but enough so that thermal expansion becomes a problem. If Thermal expansion is present a properly sized expansion tank should be installed to resolve this problem.

Do I need earthquake straps or seismic restraints?

It depends. The Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC), section 510.5 states "In seismic zones 3 and 4, water heaters shall be anchored or strapped to resist horizontal displacement due to earthquake motion. Strapping shall be at points within the upper one-third (1/3) and lower one-third (1/3) of its vertical dimensions. At the lower point, a minimum of four (4) inches (102mm) shall be maintained above the controls with the strapping." If the installed location is in these seismic zones then a strap/restraint system is required. Otherwise, please consult with a plumbing engineer to determine the proper installation method for your water heater.

Is it OK if my plumbing system has plastic pipes (PVC or PEX)?

Yes. All Hubbell water heaters will work with both types of plastic piping.

Are Hubbell Heaters made in the USA?

Yes. Hubbell water heaters are all made in the USA and our factories located in Connecticut and Massachusets and qualify for incentives under The Buy American Act and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). For more information go to the following link Here.

Do I need a thermal expansion tank?

Yes, it is recommended that a thermal expansion tank be installed with your water heater, and in many instances this is required by code. When water is heated it expands. If your system is “open” then water can backflow into the water main and this “extra” expanded water simply flows back out your system. Increasingly, plumbing systems are being closed off and backflow prevention valves are being placed between homes and the water main. This is done for a variety of reasons. For example, increasingly valves are placed between homes and water mains to protect plumbing systems from inlet water pressure. Water pressure is increasing in many cases in order to meet the demands of more densely populated areas. If your system is “closed”, then this means when you heat your water and it expands, this increased volume has nowhere to go. As water is not a very compressible material, this causes sudden increases in water pressure which can damage your water heater and your other appliances. A thermal expansion tank is a pressurized tank typically located in line immediately before the water heater. The tank contains a pressurized bladder. As your water expands, it pushes against this bladder giving the increased volume a place to go preventing rapid pressure increases due to thermal expansion. If your system is closed, installing an expansion tank may lengthen the life of your water heater by preventing excessive pressure cycling. In addition, if your home has a history of leaky faucets or other appliances that wear out prematurely, an expansion tank may fix your problem. If you are using a tankless heater, because this type of heater heats water only on demand, you may net need an expansion tank, please consult with your local installer.

How do I get service or technical support for my Hubbell heater?

Should you require support for your Hubbell water heater we ask that you contact our technical support department directly. Our technical support representatives are available to answer your questions and assist in troubleshooting your problem and directing you to a resolution. Please click here to go to our technical support web page for contact information Technical Support.

Model 177

What is Hubbell’s CAGE code?

Our CAGE code is 19857. The company name is The Electric Heater Co. and maintains a d/b/a Hubbell Electric Heater Co.

Where can I get parts for my Hubbell Navy heater?

All replacement parts are available directly from Hubbell. Please note that due to the specialized construction for these types of heaters, replacement parts are most times not “in stock” and therefore are built to order. Depending upon the particulars, delivery time for certain replacement parts could be over 6 weeks so it is highly recommended to have on hand or shore based spare parts provisioned prior to the need for replacement.

Why can’t I view Hubbell’s selection of Navy water heaters?

The US Navy has protection measures in place for its surface and submarine fleet to limit the amount of information in the public domain regarding onboard equipment. Therefore the distribution of this information is protected and is made available only to those with proper credentials. If you are a shipbuilder, naval or marine architect, federal employee or a member of the US armed forces please contact Hubbell administrator Gina Kalander at ginak@hubbellheaters.com or 203-378-2659 x115 to discuss your application and assistance with model selection.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model 177                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model BW

What is the delivery time?

In most cases the delivery time for a Hubbell water heater is approximately 10 weeks after release for production, but can be 16 weeks or more depending upon the particular requirements of your application. However, there are various sizes and configurations which Hubbell has in stock for “Quick Ship” (as early as next day t to 2 weeks) to accommodate situations that require shorter delivery. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss delivery times for your application.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What hi-limit control is provided for an over-temperature condition?

Hubbell provides a solenoid safety system for over-temperature situations. An aquastat senses the over-temperature condition and trips a solenoid which shunts the steam supply to the water heater. For semi-instantaneous water heaters (STX and BWX models) Hubbell provides an additional solenoid (aptly named a double solenoid) system to shunt the steam from entering the heating coil and to dump over heated water in the vessel to drain. For storage water heaters (ST and BW models) Hubbell provides a single solenoid system to shunt the steam supply to the heating coil thus preventing further over heating. A storage tank water heater does not typically include a second soeloid to dump the over heated water to drain due to the large volume of water that would need to be drained which could potentially exceed the capacity of the local drain.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model BW                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model BWX

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What hi-limit control is provided for an over-temperature condition?

Hubbell provides a solenoid safety system for over-temperature situations. An aquastat senses the over-temperature condition and trips a solenoid which shunts the steam supply to the water heater. For semi-instantaneous water heaters (STX and BWX models) Hubbell provides an additional solenoid (aptly named a double solenoid) system to shunt the steam from entering the heating coil and to dump over heated water in the vessel to drain. For storage water heaters (ST and BW models) Hubbell provides a single solenoid system to shunt the steam supply to the heating coil thus preventing further over heating. A storage tank water heater does not typically include a second soeloid to dump the over heated water to drain due to the large volume of water that would need to be drained which could potentially exceed the capacity of the local drain.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model CE110

Can I serve more than one hand washing fixture from the CE110?

Yes. The CE110 can be installed to service two (2) hand lavs, but will likely require the optional mixing valve in order to supply sufficient hot water to both fixtures. In this type of installation the CE110 would be set to a hotter temperature (as an example 140°F) and the mixing valve would be installed in the plumbing to mix 140°F water from the CE110 with cold water to supply safe and reliable hot water temperature (as an example 110°F) to the fixture.

Why not use a tankless heater instead of the CE110?

Both the Hubbell model CE110 and electric tankless water heaters can be considered Point-of-Use (POU) designs that work well serving hand washing lav sinks and other small demand applications. Both designs are compact and can be installed close to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). One major difference between the two is that a CE110 always needs a T&P relief valve, whereas a tankless heater may or may not depending on local code. The other major differentiating feature between the two is power consumption. The CE110 is 120v and draws either 8.3 or 3.7 amps depending upon the wattage selected (1000w or 450w). Tankless heaters do not store heated water like the CE110; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. A tankless heater therefore will require significantly more wattage to service the same application. As a comparative example a tankless heater would have to be 5.5kw to provide 0.5GPM at a 75°F rise (drawing 23 amps at 240v) to service a single lav sink, and you would need to double the size to serve two lavs, compared to installing one Hubbell model CE110 with mixing valve to serve both lavs with only 1000w 120v 8.3 amp power. Finally, it should be noted that many tankless heaters are not temperature controlled; the temperature fluctuates based upon the cold water temperature and flow of the fixture and many times require a flow restrictor or replacement aerator to be used to restrict the flow rate. The CE110 on the other hand is a temperature controlled water heater does not restrict flow in any way, which provides a more consistent and user enjoyable hand washing experience. If the tankless option is right for your application see Hubbell’s complete line of electric tankless heaters at Here

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Is the warranty ten (10) years for the entire CE110 model?

Yes. The warranty covers the entire model CE110 including the operating controls (electric element, thermostat and hi-limit). The only item not covered is the T&P relief valve.

Can I get the CE110 in voltages other than 120v?

For specialized applications we do have versions of the Model CE110 in alternate single phase voltages (208v, 240v and 277v). Please contact the factory for details.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

When to use the 450 watt model instead of the 1000 watt model?

When serving a single low use fixture often times you may be able to use the 450 watt model. For applications serving more than one fixture we recommend the 1000 watt model.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Why is the T&P valve tested to ASME standards (as opposed to CSA)?

The Hubbell water heater is built to and approved by UL to ANSI/UL 174 and CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 110 (1990). These standards require that each assembled water heater be shipped with a factory installed combination temperature and pressure relief valve sized in accordance with ASME requirements. However, if a relief valve sized to CSA is required, you must indicate this at time of requesting a quote for your water heater as this may necessitate a larger opening in the tank to accommodate a larger CSA relief valve. For reference, please see the following link to an article on this subject Here

Do I really need to install a T&P relief valve?

Yes. Even though the CE110 has minimal storage (1 gallon) and is considered a Point-of-Use heater, it still requires the installation of a combination temperature & pressure (T&P) relief valve.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Can the CE110 mount under a lav and is it ADA compliant?

Yes. The small compact size of the CE110 makes it a perfect fit for installation under a lav where it can be installed in compliance with ADA requirements.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model CR

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Are parts available from the factory?

Yes. All replacement parts for the Hubbell water heater are available from the factory. Please call 800-647-3165 and ask for our parts department. Please have your model and serial number handy. Most parts are in stock and orders placed before noon typically ship same day. However, it should be noted that the heating element component is typically not a stock item, with delivery times ranging from 2 to 10 weeks depending upon the design, it is recommended that you consider having a replacement heating element on hand if your application is critical.

What fluids can I heat with the model CR circulation heater?

The Hubbell CR model circulation heater is commonly used in applications heating industrial process water, potable domestic water, water glycol mixtures, water ethylene glycol mixtures, seawater, demineralized water and RO or DI water. Additional fluids that can be heated by the Hubbell CR circulation heater include oils, sugars and others, please consult a factory sales engineer for details. It should be noted that a Hubbell sales engineer will help to select the appropriate materials of construction and operating features necessary for the proper operation of the model CR circulation heater in your application.

Can it be packaged with a pump, expansion tank or other accessories?

Yes. Hubbell often times integrates pumps and ancillary equipment with a model CR circulation heater to provide a fully packaged and integrated skid system.

Can the heater be used as a boiler or for a space heating application?

Yes, as long as you advise the Hubbell sales engineer and specify this in your quote request. Hubbell builds the CR model circulation heater to either UL1453 (water heating only) under file KSBZ.E239672 or UL834 (boilers and water heating) under file BDJS.E51660. There are slight differences between the two designs, so it is important to know what the application is during the initial quote request phase.

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What third party approvals are available?

The Hubbell water heater is built to both US and Canadian Standards under UL1453 (water heating only) file KSBZ.E239672 or UL834 (boilers and water heating) file BDJS.E51660. In addition, the Hubbell pressure vessel storage tank is built and stamped to ASME and National Board Registered. Other approvals are available upon request at the time of quoting, including CRN (Canadian Registration Number), NR-13 (Brazilian Regulation Standard Boilers and Pressure Vessels), ABS (American Bureau of Shipping), SASO (Saudi Arabia Standards Organization) and others. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss your third party approval requirements.

What is watt density?

The Hubbell electric heating element also referred to as the immersion heater, tubular heater, or simply heating element, is the component within the Hubbell CR circulation heater that actually heats the fluid. Watt density is the term which indicates the amount of heat flux emanating from each square inch of the effective heating area (heated surface) of the heating element and is expressed as watts per square inch (W/in2). For most potable water applications, the watt density can range from 50 – 100 W/in2. For corrosive water and other water based fluids the watt density can range from 20 – 50 W/in2. For petroleum oils and higher viscosity fluids with poor thermal conductivity, watt density can range from 6 – 40 W/in2. It should be noted that a Hubbell sales engineer will help to select the appropriate watt density, materials of construction and operating features necessary for the proper operation of the model CR circulation heater in your application.

Can I install this model outdoors?

Yes, as long as you advise the Hubbell sales engineer and specify this in your quote request. The Hubbell CR circulation heater can include construction features making it suitable for a wide range of installation locations including outdoors, but this must be specified when requesting a quote from Hubbell.

Can I install this model in a hazardous location?

Yes, as long as long as you advise the Hubbell sales engineer and specify this in your quote request. You will need to advise your Hubbell sales engineer specific information regarding the hazardous location rating you require for your application including Class (I, II or III), Division (1 or 2), Group (A, B, C or D) and finally the Temperature Class (T1 thru T6). Hubbell carries UL approval for “Control Panels and Assemblies for Use in Hazardous Locations” under file NNNY.E358352 Here and “Control Panels and Assemblies for Use in Hazardous Locations Certified for Canada” under file NNNY7.E358352 Here

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model D

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Can I install my heater in a wash down or wet area?

The standard Hubbell model HD is designed for essentially NEMA 1 use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt). For wet areas, or washdown areas, please select optional NEMA 4 or 4X construction and consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Is the bronze body T&P relief valve OK for my application?

All water heaters require a combination temperature and pressure safety relief valve to relieve excessive water pressure or excessive temperature water in the event of a runaway overheating condition. These relief valves are manufactured with a bronze body with a thermo-bonded (non metallic) coated immersion sensor. After independent third party testing conducted by Analytical Services, Inc. it has been verified that the T&P relief valve has no appreciable effect on the purity and quality of high quality ultrapure DI/RO water. However, should the installation warrant that no yellow metals be present in the plumbing system, as an option Hubbell can supply a 316 stainless steel pressure only relief valve and a separate temperature relief valve can be installed by others.

What is the standard interior finish?

The standard interior surfaces have a mill 2B finish less than or equal to Ra 80. No surface treatment of material or welds is performed. As an option, Hubbell can provide mechanical finishing services for material and welds to achieve a high quality finish. In these applications the end user must specify the surface finish required, typically expressed as Average Arithmetic Roughness (Ra). Ra is the measurement of surface roughness, is the average deviation from a mean surface and is measured in micro inches or microns.

What is the difference between threaded NPT and Sanitation flanges?

Sanitary fittings are widely used in the food, dairy, beverage, biotech, pharmaceutical and other sanitary process industries. Sanitary fittings offer a way to connect two parts by creating a seal which is accomplished by means of a round gasket in a groove on the face of the fitting, with the two parts coupled by a re-attachable clamp. Similar to a traditional ANSI flange connection, the sanitary design eliminates the need for a male and female, since the fitting mates to another identical fitting. National Pipe Thread Taper (NPT) is a US standard for tapered threads used on threaded pipes and fittings as a means to form a seal when connecting two pieces. The taper on NPT threads allows two connecting pieces to form a seal when torqued as the flanks of the threads compress against each other. The Hubbell HD model is supplied as standard with NPT cold water inlet, hot water outlet and T&P relief valve connections. A customer with a sanitary system will in most instances install adapters to mate the NPT connection from the Hubbell heater to their sanitary plumbing system. However, as an option Hubbell can provide the model HD water heater with welded sanitary connections, thereby avoiding the use of NPT to sanitary adapters. However, it should be noted that the immersion heating elements are only available in threaded (straight not NPT) style. For the most stringent applications, the Hubbell heater can be specified with the Clean In Place (CIP) option including all electropolished interior surface and removable flanged end for inspection and cleaning, please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer for details.

Can Hubbell integrate a pump or other accessory with my heater?

Yes. For applications where it is desired to integrate the Hubbell heater with other accessories for a fully integrated packaged system, please consult your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Why is the ASME stamp important for my application?

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) is an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standard that provides the rules for the design, fabrication and inspection of boilers and pressure vessels. The Hubbell water heater carries the ASME stamp verifying that the pressure vessel has met the BPVC and inspected by a third party Authorized Inspector (AI). In most industrial facilities a pressure vessel must be ASME stamped to meet state and federal requirements, not to mention end user insurance requirements based upon liability concerns.

What is electropolishing?

Electropolishing refers to a process where surface metal is removed and leveled by anodic dissolution in an electrolytic solution with an imposed current. Electropolishing passivates the surface creating a mirror finish without the use of mechanical polishing. In addition, electropolishing stainless steel improves corrosion resistance by reducing the exposed product surface area, removal of metallic and nonmetallic surface inclusions, obtaining a smooth releasable surface for improved cleanability and removing some or all of the cold worked/structurally modified abrasive finished surface to expose unmodified base metal. As an option and when required for a particular application, Hubbell can provide the HD model water heater with electropolished interior surfaces.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Why do I need a special heater in RO/DI water applications?

Two main reasons: Heater Longevity and Process Contamination. A standard water heater when used with deionized (DI) or reverse osmosis (RO) water will deteriorate, corrode and fail very quickly due to corrosion of the heater components. Use of a standard heater in RO/DI water will also void all manufacturers warranties. The aggressiveness of RO/DI water will corrode carbon steel glass lined tanks, copper and bronze heating elements and other componets used in a standard water heater and will cause premature failure. Depending on the properties and temperature of the water, failure could be as quickly as a matter of days. The corrosion will also cause contamination of the RO/DI water as the corrosion process sheds undesirable metal particulates into the RO/DI process water. Suitable materials of construction for a water heater used in a RO/DI water application include 316L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800 and cement lined steel. Hubbell has a wide range of water heaters specifically designed for heating RO/DI water including gas and electric storage heaters and gas and electric tankless heaters.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model DGX

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What are the minimal mounting clearances?

From combustibles: Top 6”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”. From non-combustibles: Top 2”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1/2”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”

Why do I need a special heater in RO/DI water applications?

Two main reasons: Heater Longevity and Process Contamination. A standard water heater when used with deionized (DI) or reverse osmosis (RO) water will deteriorate, corrode and fail very quickly due to corrosion of the heater components. Use of a standard heater in RO/DI water will also void all manufacturers warranties. The aggressiveness of RO/DI water will corrode carbon steel glass lined tanks, copper and bronze heating elements and other componets used in a standard water heater and will cause premature failure. Depending on the properties and temperature of the water, failure could be as quickly as a matter of days. The corrosion will also cause contamination of the RO/DI water as the corrosion process sheds undesirable metal particulates into the RO/DI process water. Suitable materials of construction for a water heater used in a RO/DI water application include 316L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800 and cement lined steel. Hubbell has a wide range of water heaters specifically designed for heating RO/DI water including gas and electric storage heaters and gas and electric tankless heaters.

What if I need more than 250,000 BTU/Hr for my application?

Simple, you would install multiple units to achieve your desired BTU. You can install and manifold together upto 10 Hubbell gas tankless water heaters without the need for a a master controller. If you would like to simplify the installation of a multi heater system, Hubbell can factory integrate the heaters into a rack system including manifold water piping to simplify the installation process.

What type of venting can I use?

The Hubbell gas tankless heater can be vented with PVC, CPVC or Polypropylene. Please see Installation, Operation and Maintenance manual for complete venting details.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model E

Can a timer be installed on my Hubbell water heater?

Water heater timers are devices that provide automatic control of electric water heaters. They can be programmed to turn a water heater off or on at times typically set by your local utility. Your local electric utility may have in place an “Off-Peak” or Time-of-Use (TOU) rates which offer a customer the incentive to consume power during certain periods of the day. The Hubbell Model E is available with various timer control options, ranging from programmable 7 day timers to utility specific devices that control the water heater.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What does 3 phase Open Delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any water heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced water heater can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a water heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. The Hubbell model E is available up to a maximum of 12kw in 3 phase open delta wiring. Alternatively, the Hubbell model SE is a balanced 3 phase water heater, meaning that all three legs draw equal amperage. The Model SE is available up to 58kw click here details Model SE

Why is there an upper and a lower heating element in my tank?

Hubbell Model E water heaters with 30 gallon storage or more have both upper and lower heating elements in the tank, and models 20 gallon storage and less have one heating element in the tank. The purpose of having two heating elements in a tank is to improve the recovery rating in a water heater of significant storage capacity. Sometimes referred to as a “Quick Recovery” water heater, this configuration allows the upper element to heat a much smaller volume of water (about 25% of the tank's capacity) before the lower element takes over. This provides a small amount of usable hot water quickly while you wait for the bulk of the water to heat. It is worth noting that in the standard dual element design, the upper and lower heating elements are interlocked so that only one can heat at any time, with priority to the upper element. Once the thermostat controlling the upper element is satisfied (i.e. at set point temperature) the lower element is allowed to heat. As an option, you may order your Hubbell water heater with the optional “simultaneous operation” feature which allows each element to operate independently, potentially allowing both to be on at the same time in order to increase the recovery rate of the heater.

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

Why is the T&P valve tested to ASME standards (as opposed to CSA)?

The Hubbell water heater is built to and approved by UL to ANSI/UL 174 and CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 110 (1990). These standards require that each assembled water heater be shipped with a factory installed combination temperature and pressure relief valve sized in accordance with ASME requirements. However, if a relief valve sized to CSA is required, you must indicate this at time of requesting a quote for your water heater as this may necessitate a larger opening in the tank to accommodate a larger CSA relief valve. For reference, please see the following link to an article on this subject Here

What is the difference between surface and immersion thermostats?

A surface thermostat is a bi metallic sensing temperature regulating thermostat that senses the outer wall temperature of the water heater tank. An immersion thermostat is a bulb and capillary style temperature regulating thermostat that senses the water temperature through a dry immersion well in the water. A surface thermostat is adjustable up to a maximum of 170oF and an immersion thermostat adjusts up to a maximum of 194oF. A surface thermostat is typically used in low wattage water heaters, whereas an immersion thermostat is used in high wattage water heaters.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

What is the Energy Factor (EF) rating?

The Energy Factor (EF) rating represents the efficiency of the water heater. The higher the EF, the more efficient the water heater unit. Hubbell Model E water heaters are classified by the Department of Energy as residential water heaters and are rated by an Energy Factor (EF) ranging from 0.80 to 0.92. The higher the EF, the more the heater transfers energy to the water using less energy. Please note that the use of R values as a measure of efficiency is incomplete and does therefore does not accurately capture a water heater’s true efficiency as does the EF rating. For additional information check out the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) website at AHRI as well as the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) website at ACEEE

Are any Federal, State, local or utility incentives available?

Depending upon your location and the type of water heater you select for your application, there may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting the following website at Incentives and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model EMV

Why is a storage heater preferred over a tankless heater?

There are a number of factors that make a storage system more desirable than a tankless system for delivering tepid water to your safety shower. Infrastructure, pressure drop, reliability, and serviceability are the major areas where there is a significant difference between the two systems. Regarding infrastructure, a storage system is typically rated 6kw or less and a tankless system is typically rated around 150kw, a significant difference when considering wire and circuit breaker size and electrical demand, not to mention installation costs. A storage system can operate on either 1 or 3 phase power and draws at most 25 amp depending upon your power selection, whereas a tankless system is practical only in 3 phase power and draws 180 amps or more. Pressure drop through a storage system is less than 4 psi, whereas a tankless system is likely to result in a pressure drop of 15 psi or more, potentially resulting in insufficient flow through the safety shower. With respect to reliability, a storage system utilizes well proven and long fielded technology and is extremely reliable, not to mention the fact that because the system operates using stored hot water, you have visual positive verification that the system is fully hot and ready to provide tepid water before an emergency situation arises. A tankless heater on the other hand is in “standby” mode until such time that it is required. If the unit for some reason is inoperable or malfunctions, there is no way for an operator to know its status prior to an emergency event. This could be disastrous for an injured person, not to mention the facility owner, if a person is unable to properly wash down due to a malfunctioning or inoperable heater. Finally, because a tankless heater requires sophisticated controls to operate and control temperature, it has significantly more potential failure points compared to a storage system, making it not only less reliable but significantly more difficult and expensive to maintain and service.

What temperature is tepid water?

Hubbell has designed its safety shower water heater to provide as standard 85°F tepid water, although 75°F is available as an option. In the ANSI /ISEA Z358.1-2009 American National Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment standard, tepid water requirements are in the Definitions section and are clearly defined as water ranging between 60°-100°F. ANSI defines "tepid water" as "A flushing fluid temperature conducive to promoting a minimum 15 minute irrigation period. A suitable range is 16-38°C (60-100°F)". Medical professionals recommend that tepid flushing fluids be used to treat chemically injured eyes and body tissue. Temperatures that exceed 100°F can enhance chemical interaction with the eyes and skin. Conversely, water temperatures below 60°F can cause hypothermic shock. The ANSI Z358.1-2009 standard states that while cooler flushing fluids may provide immediate relief after chemical contact, “prolonged exposure to cold fluids affects the ability to maintain adequate body temperature and can result in the premature cessation of first aid treatment”.

If I lose power, will I continue to get tepid water?

Yes. This is one advantage of the Hubbell model EMV storage tepid water heater. Because the Hubbell tepid water heater design utilizes a storage tank, there is always a sufficient supply of hot water on standby and ready for an emergency fixture. Once the Hubbell storage tank achieves its set temperature, the unit will deliver tepid water even when there is a disruption of electric power to the heater (i.e. during an emergency).

What if I want to supply tepid water to more than one safety shower?

The amount of hot water required to supply tepid water per safety shower is 120 gallons. For two safety shower systems, specify the Hubbell model EMV240 which consists of two 120 gallon tanks mounted to a common skid assembly and factory piped with one mixing valve. Generally speaking, the optimal system design is to place the water heater as close to the safety shower as possible. If your system consists of more than two safety showers, you may want to consider installing one model EMV120 tepid water heater for each safety shower. Alternatively, a centrally located large storage tank (storage capacity sized at 120 gallons for each safety shower) with factory integrated mixing valve(s) may be specified to service a circulating loop. There are certain design challenges associated with a central system, Hubbell recommneds consulting with a Sales Engineer before selecting this method.

What is the pressure drop through the Hubbell model EMV water heater?

At 23 GPM (the full flow of a 20 GPM safety shower and 3 GPM of a combination face/eyewash station) the pressure drop across the entire Hubbell EMV emergency safety shower water heater is less than 4 psi.

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Can I install the Hubbell model EMV outdoors?

The standard EMV model is designed for indoor use only. However, optional construction including outdoor as well as hazardous location is available; please consult with a Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss your application. Regarding outdoor installations, heat tracing for freeze protection of plumbing lines as well as an anti scald device to purge excessive temperature due to thermal gain (sunlight and ambient conditions) must be considered.

Can I install the Hubbell model EMV in a hazardous location?

The standard EMV model is designed for indoor use in a non hazardous location only. However, optional construction is available for installation in a hazardous location. Please note you will need to provide your Hubbell Sales Engineer with specific information at the time of quote request regarding the hazardous location rating you require for your application including Class (I, II or III), Division (1 or 2), Group (A, B, C or D) and finally the Temperature Class (T1 thru T6).

What is the annual operating cost?

The annual operating cost including standby heat loss and semi-annual performance testing is approximately $154 (based upon $0.12 per kWHr) annually. This assumes an ambient temperature of 50F and incoming cold water supply of 40F and two (2) full operational 20 minute performance tests performed annually.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

What is ANSI Z358.1-2009?

The Hubbell safety shower water heater is specifically designed to provide tepid water that meets the requirements of the ANSI Z358.1-2009 Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment. This standard clearly defines tepid water as ranging between 60°-100°F for the purpose of acting as "A flushing fluid temperature conducive to promoting a minimum 15 minute irrigation period. A suitable range is 16-38°C (60-100°F)". Medical professionals recommend that tepid flushing fluids be used to treat chemically injured eyes and body tissue. Temperatures that exceed 100°F can enhance chemical interaction with the eyes and skin. Conversely, water temperatures below 60°F can cause hypothermic shock. The ANSI Z358.1-2009 standard states that while cooler flushing fluids may provide immediate relief after chemical contact, “prolonged exposure to cold fluids affects the ability to maintain adequate body temperature and can result in the premature cessation of first aid treatment”.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model EMV                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model ER

What hazardous atmospheres is the Hubbell model ER approved for?

You will need to advise your Hubbell sales engineer specific information regarding the hazardous location rating you require for your application including Class (I, II or III), Division (1 or 2), Group (A, B, C or D) and finally the Temperature Class (T1 thru T6). Hubbell carries UL approval for “Control Panels and Assemblies for Use in Hazardous Locations” under file NNNY.E358352 Here and “Control Panels and Assemblies for Use in Hazardous Locations Certified for Canada” under file NNNY7.E358352 Here

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What is a purge and pressurized system?

The concept of a purge & pressurized system is to allow the use of standard NEMA 4/12 enclosures in hazardous locations. A Hubbell model ER explosion resistant purge & pressurized water heater includes a factory installed purge & pressurization system attached to the enclosure which supplies a flow of clean air or an inert gas to maintain a positive pressure inside the enclosure and to reduce the internal concentration of hazardous material and gases to a safe level. This process starts by purging the interior of the enclosure of hazardous airborne impurities and gases to acceptable levels of concentration. Once these levels are met, the process changes to that of pressurization. This change does not lead to a break in the flow of air or inert gas because it would be then be possible for hazardous contaminants to enter/reenter the enclosure possibly leading to unacceptable levels. Pressurization now keeps the pressure inside the enclosure constant and above the ambient pressure so that the lower pressure external hazardous atmosphere cannot penetrate the enclosure. For a detailed discussion go to to Here

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model ER                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model ETX

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Does the Hubbell electric tankless water heater restrict water flow?

No. Hubbell electric tankless water heaters do not restrict water flow. Other brands may incorporate a flow restrictor device within their tankless heater or require a flow restricting device be installed in the plumbing or fixture itself as a method for controlling temperature. This is not the case for Hubbell electric tankless water heaters.

What is the difference between gas & electric tankless water heaters?

The most obvious difference between gas and electric tankless water heaters is the energy source that is used. Gas tankless heaters use either Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG), but also use electricity (120v) to power an internal fan and other controls. Electric tankless heaters operate using only electricity. Electric tankless water heaters operate at higher energy efficiency, in the case of Hubbell the thermal efficiency is 98%+, compared to gas tankless which ranges from Energy Factor ratings of 0.82 to 0.96 depending upon model. Electric tankless is more efficient in large part because gas tankless models operate by burning gas, which is harder to control than electricity and is less efficient due to heat lost in the flue exhaust. Gas heaters require exhaust and/or fresh air intake venting, whereas electric heaters do not. Please note that efficiency and operating cost are two different things, to determine operating cost one must consider their cost of energy and usage in addition to the operating efficiency of the heater. Gas tankless water heaters cost more to purchase compared to electric tankless heaters. When replacing a storage tank type water heater with a tankless heater, it should be noted that both gas and electric tankless require changes to the existing plumbing and wiring of the tank they are replacing. When installing a new gas tankless heater, most installations will require a new/upgraded venting and gas line. When installing a new electric tankless heater, most installations will require upgraded wiring to the heater and replacement of the circuit breakers in the electrical panel. The largest available residential and light duty commercial gas tankless water heater is 199,000 BTU/Hr, but the most common size has an output of about 123,000 BTU/Hr. After factoring for energy efficiency, this is equivalent to roughly 36 kW. By contrast, the largest residential/light duty commercial electric tankless water heater is 27 kW, which has an effective output of 91,000 BTU/Hr. In terms of operation and maintenance, a gas tankless heater is considerably more complicated to maintain and service compared to electric tankless. In addition, an electric tankless heater will provide more accurate and consistent hot water temperature throughout a full range of flow rates compared to a gas tankless heater. However, gas tankless heaters because they are available in larger BTU sizes can provide a higher hot water flow rate/temperature rise for very large installations compared to a standard electric tankless heater.

What temperature is tepid water?

Hubbell has designed its safety shower water heater to provide as standard 85°F tepid water, although 75°F is available as an option. In the ANSI /ISEA Z358.1-2009 American National Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment standard, tepid water requirements are in the Definitions section and are clearly defined as water ranging between 60°-100°F. ANSI defines "tepid water" as "A flushing fluid temperature conducive to promoting a minimum 15 minute irrigation period. A suitable range is 16-38°C (60-100°F)". Medical professionals recommend that tepid flushing fluids be used to treat chemically injured eyes and body tissue. Temperatures that exceed 100°F can enhance chemical interaction with the eyes and skin. Conversely, water temperatures below 60°F can cause hypothermic shock. The ANSI Z358.1-2009 standard states that while cooler flushing fluids may provide immediate relief after chemical contact, “prolonged exposure to cold fluids affects the ability to maintain adequate body temperature and can result in the premature cessation of first aid treatment”.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the life expectancy of the Hubbell tankless water heater?

Depending on the type of installation, usage and water quality, the Hubbell electric tankless water heater can last from 15 to 25 years. In a typical application when properly maintained a Hubbell electric tankless water heater should have no problem lasting 25 years or more.

Does my tankless water heater need a T&P relief valve?

Yes and no. NEC paragraph 422-27 requires all water heaters to be equipped with a temperature limiting device in addition to its control thermostat with the exception of instantaneous water heaters identified as being suitable for such use and with a capacity of 4L (1 gallon) or less. Hubbell tankless heaters are have a capacity of less than 1 gallon and are listed to UL Standard 499 which is recognized by NEC and thus meet the requirements of this exception. However individual state and/or local plumbing codes, such as Massachusetts and Kentucky, may require the installation of a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. Therefore Hubbell recommends checking state and local plumbing codes for verification.

What is ANSI Z358.1-2009?

The Hubbell safety shower water heater is specifically designed to provide tepid water that meets the requirements of the ANSI Z358.1-2009 Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment. This standard clearly defines tepid water as ranging between 60°-100°F for the purpose of acting as "A flushing fluid temperature conducive to promoting a minimum 15 minute irrigation period. A suitable range is 16-38°C (60-100°F)". Medical professionals recommend that tepid flushing fluids be used to treat chemically injured eyes and body tissue. Temperatures that exceed 100°F can enhance chemical interaction with the eyes and skin. Conversely, water temperatures below 60°F can cause hypothermic shock. The ANSI Z358.1-2009 standard states that while cooler flushing fluids may provide immediate relief after chemical contact, “prolonged exposure to cold fluids affects the ability to maintain adequate body temperature and can result in the premature cessation of first aid treatment”.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model ETX                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model F

What do I do if my steam pressure exceeds 15psi?

For domestic potable water you must install a pressure reducing valve in the steam line prior to the Hubbell F model to reduce the steam pressure to 15psi. This provides the optimal conditions for the water heater’s temperature control system, thus providing stable and consistent hot water +/- 4 degrees F. For process systems with a less critical requirement for temperature stability, saturated steam pressure up to 35 psi can be used but the temperature stability will be affected and will result in hot water temperature varying by +/- 8 degrees F.

Can I use superheated steam with my F model?

No. The F model is designed to work with saturated steam.

Can I really replace my storage tank water heater with the F model?

Yes you can. The Hubbell F model water heater is available in 8 different sizes ranging from 15 GPM up to 120 GPM capacities.

How is temperature controlled without a thermostat or steam valve?

Temperature control is achieved through the self contained blending valve, rather than an expensive and maintenance intensive steam control valve and thermostat. Water is overheated in the heat exchanger then is fed to the pressure balanced blending valve where a precise amount of hot and cold water is mixed to provide accurate temperature at the hot water outlet. Setting the temperature is outlined in Section II of the operation & maintenance manual Here.

Why is a spiral wound heat exchanger better than a U-Tube type?

Compared to standard U-tube heat exchangers, a spiral wound heat exchangers provide higher operating efficiency in a smaller footprint making it better suited to demanding hot water applications. The spiral wound heat exchanger consists of a dual manifold multi-tube spiral tube assembly inserted into a shell, where the water and steam are designed for full counter flow heat transfer, resulting in up to a 40% improvement in heat transfer compared to a typical shell and tube heat exchanger. In addition, the spiral wound heat exchanger is more resistant to thermal and pressure shock compared to standard U-tube heat exchangers.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

How does the blending valve feed forward control system work?

The Hubbell Blending Valve is the temperature controlling device within the F model water heater and operates as a feed forward control. The valve recognizes when there is hot water demand by sensing the change in water pressure (when a fixture opens there is a pressure drop in the hot water system) compared to the cold water feed. Reacting to the change in pressure, the valve adjusts its mixing ports to blend a precise amount of cold water with over heated water to output mixed water at the desired system hot water temperature. For a more detailed explanation go to the Hubbell F model brochure Here

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

How does the heater work in a hot water recirculation loop system?

A recirculation loop is sometimes used in a plumbing system to ensure hot water is available at the fixture even though the water heater may be a significant distance away. This loop usually continuously re-circulates the hot water via a small pump that returns the water to the heater for re heating if required. AS the F Model water heater operates with a feed forward pressure differential system and does not control by sensing temperature, the temperature of the water returning back to the loop from the heater is likely to escalate. Therefore, a recirculating hot water system requires the recirculation package option and use of a 3-way thermostatic diverting valve. The thermostatic valve has a thermal sensing element rated at the desired loop temperature. As the temperature in the loop begins to decrease from heat loss through the piping, the thermostatic element responds by causing the water flow to be diverted to the heater. When the temperature in the loop is at the desired temperature the flow of the water by-passes the heater. For normal operation, approximately 10% of the system capacity is re-circulated back to the heater. For a plumbing schematic detailing this piping arrangement please see the Installation, Operating & Maintenance manual at Here

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model F                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model GSE

Are any Federal, State, local or utility incentives available?

Depending upon your location and the type of water heater you select for your application, there may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting the following website at Incentives and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

What type of venting can I use?

The Hubbell gas tankless heater can be vented with PVC, CPVC or Polypropylene. Please see Installation, Operation and Maintenance manual for complete venting details.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model GSE                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model GX

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

What are the minimal mounting clearances?

From combustibles: Top 6”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”. From non-combustibles: Top 2”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1/2”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”

Will I get instant hot water with a tankless water heater?

This is a common misconception of tankless water heaters. A tankless water heater does heat water on-demand instantly. Just like a tank water heater, it still takes the same amount of time for the hot water to travel through the pipes and flush out the standing water that has cooled down and is already inside the hot water plumbing. No matter what type of heater is installed, it will always take time for the hot water to travel through the plumbing before arriving at the fixture. The length of time it takes always depends on the length of the pipes, the amount of flow through the fixture and the water pressure. In general, a centralized water heater will require the most time to deliver hot water to the fixture, whereas a Point-of-Use water heater will deliver hot water to the fixture in the shortest amount of time.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

How is a tankless heater different from a storage tank heater?

A storage tank water heater maintains a tank full of hot water 24/7/365 and will heat water even during periods of no usage in order to make up for standby heat loss. A tankless water heater only consumes power (whether its gas or electric) when there is demand for hot water. They take up significantly less space and typically can be located close to the point of use, thus providing more efficient delivery of hot water. Tankless water heaters provide continuous hot water and never run out as long as the heater capacity is not exceeded.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Are any Federal, State, local or utility incentives available?

Depending upon your location and the type of water heater you select for your application, there may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting the following website at Incentives and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What is the difference between gas & electric tankless water heaters?

The most obvious difference between gas and electric tankless water heaters is the energy source that is used. Gas tankless heaters use either Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG), but also use electricity (120v) to power an internal fan and other controls. Electric tankless heaters operate using only electricity. Electric tankless water heaters operate at higher energy efficiency, in the case of Hubbell the thermal efficiency is 98%+, compared to gas tankless which ranges from Energy Factor ratings of 0.82 to 0.96 depending upon model. Electric tankless is more efficient in large part because gas tankless models operate by burning gas, which is harder to control than electricity and is less efficient due to heat lost in the flue exhaust. Gas heaters require exhaust and/or fresh air intake venting, whereas electric heaters do not. Please note that efficiency and operating cost are two different things, to determine operating cost one must consider their cost of energy and usage in addition to the operating efficiency of the heater. Gas tankless water heaters cost more to purchase compared to electric tankless heaters. When replacing a storage tank type water heater with a tankless heater, it should be noted that both gas and electric tankless require changes to the existing plumbing and wiring of the tank they are replacing. When installing a new gas tankless heater, most installations will require a new/upgraded venting and gas line. When installing a new electric tankless heater, most installations will require upgraded wiring to the heater and replacement of the circuit breakers in the electrical panel. The largest available residential and light duty commercial gas tankless water heater is 199,000 BTU/Hr, but the most common size has an output of about 123,000 BTU/Hr. After factoring for energy efficiency, this is equivalent to roughly 36 kW. By contrast, the largest residential/light duty commercial electric tankless water heater is 27 kW, which has an effective output of 91,000 BTU/Hr. In terms of operation and maintenance, a gas tankless heater is considerably more complicated to maintain and service compared to electric tankless. In addition, an electric tankless heater will provide more accurate and consistent hot water temperature throughout a full range of flow rates compared to a gas tankless heater. However, gas tankless heaters because they are available in larger BTU sizes can provide a higher hot water flow rate/temperature rise for very large installations compared to a standard electric tankless heater.

What if I need more than 250,000 BTU/Hr for my application?

Simple, you would install multiple units to achieve your desired BTU. You can install and manifold together upto 10 Hubbell gas tankless water heaters without the need for a a master controller. If you would like to simplify the installation of a multi heater system, Hubbell can factory integrate the heaters into a rack system including manifold water piping to simplify the installation process.

What type of venting can I use?

The Hubbell gas tankless heater can be vented with PVC, CPVC or Polypropylene. Please see Installation, Operation and Maintenance manual for complete venting details.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model GX                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model GXT

Are any Federal, State, local or utility incentives available?

Depending upon your location and the type of water heater you select for your application, there may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting the following website at Incentives and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

What type of venting can I use?

The Hubbell gas tankless heater can be vented with PVC, CPVC or Polypropylene. Please see Installation, Operation and Maintenance manual for complete venting details.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model GXT                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model HD

What is delivery on a standard Hubbell HD model?

The delivery time for a standard Hubbell model HD water heater is 2 days or less. However, if optional accessories are selected the delivery time maybe extended, please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Is the bronze body T&P relief valve OK for my application?

All water heaters require a combination temperature and pressure safety relief valve to relieve excessive water pressure or excessive temperature water in the event of a runaway overheating condition. These relief valves are manufactured with a bronze body with a thermo-bonded (non metallic) coated immersion sensor. After independent third party testing conducted by Analytical Services, Inc. it has been verified that the T&P relief valve has no appreciable effect on the purity and quality of high quality ultrapure DI/RO water. However, should the installation warrant that no yellow metals be present in the plumbing system, as an option Hubbell can supply a 316 stainless steel pressure only relief valve and a separate temperature relief valve can be installed by others.

What is the difference between threaded NPT and Sanitation flanges?

Sanitary fittings are widely used in the food, dairy, beverage, biotech, pharmaceutical and other sanitary process industries. Sanitary fittings offer a way to connect two parts by creating a seal which is accomplished by means of a round gasket in a groove on the face of the fitting, with the two parts coupled by a re-attachable clamp. Similar to a traditional ANSI flange connection, the sanitary design eliminates the need for a male and female, since the fitting mates to another identical fitting. National Pipe Thread Taper (NPT) is a US standard for tapered threads used on threaded pipes and fittings as a means to form a seal when connecting two pieces. The taper on NPT threads allows two connecting pieces to form a seal when torqued as the flanks of the threads compress against each other. The Hubbell HD model is supplied as standard with NPT cold water inlet, hot water outlet and T&P relief valve connections. A customer with a sanitary system will in most instances install adapters to mate the NPT connection from the Hubbell heater to their sanitary plumbing system. However, as an option Hubbell can provide the model HD water heater with welded sanitary connections, thereby avoiding the use of NPT to sanitary adapters. However, it should be noted that the immersion heating elements are only available in threaded (straight not NPT) style. For the most stringent applications, the Hubbell heater can be specified with the Clean In Place (CIP) option including all electropolished interior surface and removable flanged end for inspection and cleaning, please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer for details.

Why is the ASME stamp important for my application?

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) is an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standard that provides the rules for the design, fabrication and inspection of boilers and pressure vessels. The Hubbell water heater carries the ASME stamp verifying that the pressure vessel has met the BPVC and inspected by a third party Authorized Inspector (AI). In most industrial facilities a pressure vessel must be ASME stamped to meet state and federal requirements, not to mention end user insurance requirements based upon liability concerns.

What is the standard interior finish?

The standard interior surfaces have a mill 2B finish less than or equal to Ra 80. No surface treatment of material or welds is performed. As an option, Hubbell can provide mechanical finishing services for material and welds to achieve a high quality finish. In these applications the end user must specify the surface finish required, typically expressed as Average Arithmetic Roughness (Ra). Ra is the measurement of surface roughness, is the average deviation from a mean surface and is measured in micro inches or microns.

Can Hubbell integrate a pump or other accessory with my heater?

Yes. For applications where it is desired to integrate the Hubbell heater with other accessories for a fully integrated packaged system, please consult your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Can I install my heater in a wash down or wet area?

The standard Hubbell model HD is designed for essentially NEMA 1 use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt). For wet areas, or washdown areas, please select optional NEMA 4 or 4X construction and consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

What is passivation?

Passivation of stainless steel is a process performed to make a surface passive by creating a surface film that causes the surface to lose its chemical reactivity. Stainless steel passivation unipotentializes the stainless steel with the oxygen absorbed by the metal surface, creating a monomolecular oxide film which can result in improved corrosion resistance of the metal. The passivation of stainless steel is performed when free iron, oxide scale, rust, iron particles, metal chips or other nonvolatile deposits are removed from the surface layer. When these particles are present they may adversely affect the metallurgical or sanitary condition or stability of the surface, and are likely to lead to contamination of the process fluid. As an option and when required for a particular application, Hubbell can provide passivation for the HD model water heater.

What is electropolishing?

Electropolishing refers to a process where surface metal is removed and leveled by anodic dissolution in an electrolytic solution with an imposed current. Electropolishing passivates the surface creating a mirror finish without the use of mechanical polishing. In addition, electropolishing stainless steel improves corrosion resistance by reducing the exposed product surface area, removal of metallic and nonmetallic surface inclusions, obtaining a smooth releasable surface for improved cleanability and removing some or all of the cold worked/structurally modified abrasive finished surface to expose unmodified base metal. As an option and when required for a particular application, Hubbell can provide the HD model water heater with electropolished interior surfaces.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Why do I need a special heater in RO/DI water applications?

Two main reasons: Heater Longevity and Process Contamination. A standard water heater when used with deionized (DI) or reverse osmosis (RO) water will deteriorate, corrode and fail very quickly due to corrosion of the heater components. Use of a standard heater in RO/DI water will also void all manufacturers warranties. The aggressiveness of RO/DI water will corrode carbon steel glass lined tanks, copper and bronze heating elements and other componets used in a standard water heater and will cause premature failure. Depending on the properties and temperature of the water, failure could be as quickly as a matter of days. The corrosion will also cause contamination of the RO/DI water as the corrosion process sheds undesirable metal particulates into the RO/DI process water. Suitable materials of construction for a water heater used in a RO/DI water application include 316L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800 and cement lined steel. Hubbell has a wide range of water heaters specifically designed for heating RO/DI water including gas and electric storage heaters and gas and electric tankless heaters.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model HD                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model HE/HSE

Is a drain pan/drip tray needed for a ceiling hung water heater?

Yes. Without exception. The pan must also be connected to a suitable drain so water is properly routed to a drain.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model HE/HSE                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model HX/TX

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What temperature should the tankless heater be set to?

The Hubbell electric tankless water heater can be configured by the user to operate in any of three different ranges. Low temperature range is 32-104°F, Standard range is 32-140°F and High Temperature range is 32-194°F. The operator can field configure the electronic controller to operate in any of these ranges, and can then select a set temperature within the selected range that is appropriate for the application. The controller is also field configurable for either °F or °C operation and visual display

How is a tankless heater different from a storage tank heater?

A storage tank water heater maintains a tank full of hot water 24/7/365 and will heat water even during periods of no usage in order to make up for standby heat loss. A tankless water heater only consumes power (whether its gas or electric) when there is demand for hot water. They take up significantly less space and typically can be located close to the point of use, thus providing more efficient delivery of hot water. Tankless water heaters provide continuous hot water and never run out as long as the heater capacity is not exceeded.

Does the Hubbell electric tankless water heater restrict water flow?

No. Hubbell electric tankless water heaters do not restrict water flow. Other brands may incorporate a flow restrictor device within their tankless heater or require a flow restricting device be installed in the plumbing or fixture itself as a method for controlling temperature. This is not the case for Hubbell electric tankless water heaters.

How small is the Hubbell electric tankless water heater?

About the size of an average briefcase. The Hubbell tankless water heaters are a fraction of the size of a conventional storage tank type water heater and they mount on the wall, so you can reclaim 100% of the floor space once occupied by your conventional water heater.

Can the standard Hubbell tankless water heater be installed outside?

No. However, Hubbell does off a electric tankless model with NEMA 4 construction and suitable for outdoor installation, please see Hubbell model TX at Here

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

What is the difference between gas & electric tankless water heaters?

The most obvious difference between gas and electric tankless water heaters is the energy source that is used. Gas tankless heaters use either Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG), but also use electricity (120v) to power an internal fan and other controls. Electric tankless heaters operate using only electricity. Electric tankless water heaters operate at higher energy efficiency, in the case of Hubbell the thermal efficiency is 98%+, compared to gas tankless which ranges from Energy Factor ratings of 0.82 to 0.96 depending upon model. Electric tankless is more efficient in large part because gas tankless models operate by burning gas, which is harder to control than electricity and is less efficient due to heat lost in the flue exhaust. Gas heaters require exhaust and/or fresh air intake venting, whereas electric heaters do not. Please note that efficiency and operating cost are two different things, to determine operating cost one must consider their cost of energy and usage in addition to the operating efficiency of the heater. Gas tankless water heaters cost more to purchase compared to electric tankless heaters. When replacing a storage tank type water heater with a tankless heater, it should be noted that both gas and electric tankless require changes to the existing plumbing and wiring of the tank they are replacing. When installing a new gas tankless heater, most installations will require a new/upgraded venting and gas line. When installing a new electric tankless heater, most installations will require upgraded wiring to the heater and replacement of the circuit breakers in the electrical panel. The largest available residential and light duty commercial gas tankless water heater is 199,000 BTU/Hr, but the most common size has an output of about 123,000 BTU/Hr. After factoring for energy efficiency, this is equivalent to roughly 36 kW. By contrast, the largest residential/light duty commercial electric tankless water heater is 27 kW, which has an effective output of 91,000 BTU/Hr. In terms of operation and maintenance, a gas tankless heater is considerably more complicated to maintain and service compared to electric tankless. In addition, an electric tankless heater will provide more accurate and consistent hot water temperature throughout a full range of flow rates compared to a gas tankless heater. However, gas tankless heaters because they are available in larger BTU sizes can provide a higher hot water flow rate/temperature rise for very large installations compared to a standard electric tankless heater.

What is the life expectancy of the Hubbell tankless water heater?

Depending on the type of installation, usage and water quality, the Hubbell electric tankless water heater can last from 15 to 25 years. In a typical application when properly maintained a Hubbell electric tankless water heater should have no problem lasting 25 years or more.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Does my tankless water heater need a T&P relief valve?

Yes and no. NEC paragraph 422-27 requires all water heaters to be equipped with a temperature limiting device in addition to its control thermostat with the exception of instantaneous water heaters identified as being suitable for such use and with a capacity of 4L (1 gallon) or less. Hubbell tankless heaters are have a capacity of less than 1 gallon and are listed to UL Standard 499 which is recognized by NEC and thus meet the requirements of this exception. However individual state and/or local plumbing codes, such as Massachusetts and Kentucky, may require the installation of a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. Therefore Hubbell recommends checking state and local plumbing codes for verification.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model Integrated Skid

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model J

Can the Hubbell booster be used in a low temp application?

Yes. The Hubbell booster heater includes an advanced electronic temperature controller which does not require special calibration for a low temp application. In comparison, other booster heater brands that use a mechanical thermostat need to specify when the booster is for a low temp application so the thermostat can be specially calibrated at the factory.

What data is required when sizing a booster heater to a dishmachine?

Essential information is the temperature of the incoming water from the primary water source, desired temperature rise and the make and model of the dishmachine. If the dishmachine is unknown, then you must provide gallons per hour (GPH) required by the dishmachine for the final rinse cycle. The formula to determine the amount of kW the booster heater needs to be is as follows: GPH x °F Temp Rise x 0.00244 = kW required.

Can I convert a Hubbell booster from 1 phase to 3 phase, or vise versa?

Only Hubbell 6, 7 or 9kW models in 208v or 240v can be field converted from single phase to three phase power or from three phase to single phase power. All Hubbell boosters when wired for three phase are balanced. Hubbell does not recommend installing any booster heater that is an unbalanced three phase. All other kW Models cannot be field converted.

What does 3 phase Open Delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any water heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced water heater can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a water heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. The Hubbell model E is available up to a maximum of 12kw in 3 phase open delta wiring. Alternatively, the Hubbell model SE is a balanced 3 phase water heater, meaning that all three legs draw equal amperage. The Model SE is available up to 58kw click here details Model SE

Do I want the 6 or 16 gallon size?

The J6 is a 6 gallon tank and the J16 is a 16 gallon tank. The 16 gallon model has a larger footprint, which might be considered by some to be easier to service. However, the 6 gallon model is lower initial cost compared to the 16 gallon model. Otherwise, either model is acceptable for use when both are shown in the selection chart.

What is the purpose of a hot water booster heater?

The primary function of a booster heater is to provide 180°F (82°C) hot water for the final sanitizing rinse in a commercial dishwasher.

Can I field convert the voltage of a Hubbell booster heater?

No. Hubbell boosters are manufactured and UL approved to be factory wired at a specific voltage and are NOT designed to be field convertible with respect to voltage changes.

What does 3-phase open delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any booster heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced configuration can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a booster heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. All Hubbell booster heaters are balanced, meaning that all legs of power draw equal amperage, and therefore this issue is not applicable to Hubbell. However, other brands in the market do use three phase unbalanced wiring which should be carefully considered before installing.

What is step loading?

All Hubbell boosters (both the 6 gallon and the 16 gallon models) are controlled by an electronic temperature controller which provides step load operation for all Hubbell boosters with more than one heating circuit. The Hubbell electronic controller operates each heating circuit independently, allowing each circuit to be energized as needed and non-simultaneously with another circuit. During periods of use, the first stage (i.e. circuit) heating elements will energize and if additional heating is required the second stage (circuit) will energize. In addition, the Hubbell electronic controller rotates the circuits and utilizes “first on first off” logic to equalize wear and tear on all circuits. This step loading, also referred to as staging, allows for reduced energy costs compared to a booster that has all of its heating circuits controlled together in an all ON or all OFF manner.

What information is needed when purchasing a Hubbell booster heater?

Hubbell requires that you order by the Hubbell booster model number and specify the voltage, phase, quantity and any optional accessories desired.

What is the warranty on a Hubbell booster heater?

One (1) Year Parts and Labor, full ten (10) years on the tank. Hubbell does not pro-rate its tank warranty as other brands do.

Are there any special provisions for a marine booster heater?

Yes. Booster heaters in marine applications are used in the galley for the dishmachine or for a galley hood washing application. Marine applications require special construction features to ensure longevity and proper operation in a marine environment. In addition, the booster heater must be constructed in conformance to USCG 46 CFR Part 53.01 and the pressure vessel must be designed and constructed to the proper ASME code and stamped. A Hubbell marine booster is manufactured under a Certificate of Manufacturing Assessment as issued by American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Here Please contact a factory sales engineer to provide the proper booster heater for marine use.

Can a Hubbell booster heater be used as a primary water heater?

Yes, Hubbell booster heaters are capable of acting as a primary water heater when properly sized and configured for the application.

Are slide mount brackets available in lieu of legs?

Slide mounting brackets are available only on Hubbell model J6 6 gallon boosters because of weight and size limitations. Hubbell J16 16 gallon booster heaters must be mounted on legs. There is no charge for slide mounting brackets when ordered with the booster heater in lieu of legs. When you order slide mounting brackets, you will not receive legs with your booster.

How is a booster heater to be positioned when installed?

The booster heater must be installed in a horizontal position, with the base parallel to the floor and the inlet connection at the lowest point. The booster heater must be within 5 linear feet of the dishmachine.

What is the function of the low water cut-off?

The low water cut-off (LWCO) is a protective electronic device wired within the control circuit designed to shut off power to the heating elements in the event a low or insufficient water level is detected in the tank. This safety device prevents the elements from energizing and burning out in a low or no water condition. The LWCO is factory configured to automatically reset when the water level is safe, but can be field configured for manual reset if desired.

What is the method of shipment for Hubbell booster heaters?

All Hubbell J6 6 gallon models ship via UPS. All Hubbell J16 16 gallon models ship via common carrier under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the shipping cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”.

What is the typical lead time for a Hubbell booster heater?

All Hubbell boosters ship same day when orders are received by 12:00pm EST.

What standard accessories are included with Hubbell booster heaters?

All Hubbell J6 and J16 model boosters are supplied with the following accessories shipped loose: One (1) T&P relief valve, one (1) bronze body pressure reducing valve with built-in bypass, one (1)combo temperature and pressure gauge, two (2) dielectric unions and one (1) set of four 6" plastic legs.

What size piping is required for a booster heater installation?

¾" piping.

What is a shock absorber and what is it used for?

A shock absorber is an accessory item that can be used in any water heater application. It reduces water hammer, or the "banging noise" that results from quick closing solenoid valves on the dishmachine.

What voltages are available for the Hubbell booster heater?

Hubbell makes a wide range of booster heaters in various kw ratings for the following voltages: 120v, 208v, 240v, 380v, 415v, 440v, 480v, 575v and 600v. Booster heaters are also available for nominal voltages (e.g. 220v, 230v, 460v etc…), please consult factory to determine the kw selection available for these voltages.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Where can I get service for my booster heater?

Should you require service for your Hubbell booster heater please contact an Authorized Hubbell Service Agent. Please go to the following link to enter your zip code and find the nearest Service Agent Service Agent Locator.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Does Hubbell make a 120v booster heater?

Yes. Hubbell manufactures 120 volt booster heaters offered from 1kW to 5.7 kW. Available 120 Volt models are: J32.9A (2.9kW), J35.7A (5.7kW), J61A (1kW), J61.5A (1.5kW), J62A (2kW),and J63A (3kW).

Back to Model J                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model JBX

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What is the purpose of a hot water booster heater?

The primary function of a booster heater is to provide 180°F (82°C) hot water for the final sanitizing rinse in a commercial dishwasher.

What are the minimal mounting clearances?

From combustibles: Top 6”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”. From non-combustibles: Top 2”, Back 5/8”, Sides 1/2”, Front 2”, Bottom 12”

What type of venting can I use?

The Hubbell gas tankless heater can be vented with PVC, CPVC or Polypropylene. Please see Installation, Operation and Maintenance manual for complete venting details.

Where can I get service for my booster heater?

Should you require service for your Hubbell booster heater please contact an Authorized Hubbell Service Agent. Please go to the following link to enter your zip code and find the nearest Service Agent Service Agent Locator.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model JTX

How small is the Hubbell electric tankless water heater?

About the size of an average briefcase. The Hubbell tankless water heaters are a fraction of the size of a conventional storage tank type water heater and they mount on the wall, so you can reclaim 100% of the floor space once occupied by your conventional water heater.

Does the Hubbell electric tankless water heater restrict water flow?

No. Hubbell electric tankless water heaters do not restrict water flow. Other brands may incorporate a flow restrictor device within their tankless heater or require a flow restricting device be installed in the plumbing or fixture itself as a method for controlling temperature. This is not the case for Hubbell electric tankless water heaters.

How is a tankless heater different from a storage tank heater?

A storage tank water heater maintains a tank full of hot water 24/7/365 and will heat water even during periods of no usage in order to make up for standby heat loss. A tankless water heater only consumes power (whether its gas or electric) when there is demand for hot water. They take up significantly less space and typically can be located close to the point of use, thus providing more efficient delivery of hot water. Tankless water heaters provide continuous hot water and never run out as long as the heater capacity is not exceeded.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What is the purpose of a hot water booster heater?

The primary function of a booster heater is to provide 180°F (82°C) hot water for the final sanitizing rinse in a commercial dishwasher.

What voltages are available for the Hubbell booster heater?

Hubbell makes a wide range of booster heaters in various kw ratings for the following voltages: 120v, 208v, 240v, 380v, 415v, 440v, 480v, 575v and 600v. Booster heaters are also available for nominal voltages (e.g. 220v, 230v, 460v etc…), please consult factory to determine the kw selection available for these voltages.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

Can the standard Hubbell tankless water heater be installed outside?

No. However, Hubbell does off a electric tankless model with NEMA 4 construction and suitable for outdoor installation, please see Hubbell model TX at Here

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Where can I get service for my booster heater?

Should you require service for your Hubbell booster heater please contact an Authorized Hubbell Service Agent. Please go to the following link to enter your zip code and find the nearest Service Agent Service Agent Locator.

Does my tankless water heater need a T&P relief valve?

Yes and no. NEC paragraph 422-27 requires all water heaters to be equipped with a temperature limiting device in addition to its control thermostat with the exception of instantaneous water heaters identified as being suitable for such use and with a capacity of 4L (1 gallon) or less. Hubbell tankless heaters are have a capacity of less than 1 gallon and are listed to UL Standard 499 which is recognized by NEC and thus meet the requirements of this exception. However individual state and/or local plumbing codes, such as Massachusetts and Kentucky, may require the installation of a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. Therefore Hubbell recommends checking state and local plumbing codes for verification.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model ME

Is American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) approval needed?

Equipment and specifically water heaters for use in commercial marine applications require special construction features to ensure longevity and proper operation in a marine environment. In addition, the water heater must be constructed in conformance to the Code of Federal Regulations USCG 46 CFR Part 53.01 and the pressure vessel must be designed and constructed to the proper ASME code and stamped. A Hubbell marine water heater is manufactured under a Certificate of Manufacturing Assessment as issued by American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Here

Is a glass lined tank recommended for marine use?

Not in a commercial marine environment. The real cost of a water heater in a marine environment, especially commercial marine, is the cost of replacement. Therefore, it makes economic sense to install a water heater with a long life expectancy. Hence, glass lined water heaters are not the best choice in a marine environment when a cement lined water heater can typically provide 3 times longer life in comparison.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Can I get my water heater made for horizontal installation?

Yes. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Why would I want a copper alloy tank for my application?

If your marine application demands the longest life and most reliable operation, then you should consider a solid copper alloy tank for your water heater. This type of tank is constructed from 90/10 copper nickel (or copper silicon 655) alloy for maximum longevity. This copper alloy is highly corrosion resistant even at elevated water temperature and has the most desirable characteristics for use as a water heater tank. This construction is intended to last the life of your ship, and as a result is likely to have the lowest total cost of ownership over th life of the ship when one considers the tremendous cost for removing and replacing a lined steel water heater. Ship owners know all too well the real cost involved of cutting out and replacing equipment. Therefore, the owner motivated to provide the lowest total cost of ownership water heater will benefit when the onboard water heater is specified as copper alloy.

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

What is the difference between surface and immersion thermostats?

A surface thermostat is a bi metallic sensing temperature regulating thermostat that senses the outer wall temperature of the water heater tank. An immersion thermostat is a bulb and capillary style temperature regulating thermostat that senses the water temperature through a dry immersion well in the water. A surface thermostat is adjustable up to a maximum of 170oF and an immersion thermostat adjusts up to a maximum of 194oF. A surface thermostat is typically used in low wattage water heaters, whereas an immersion thermostat is used in high wattage water heaters.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Why is the T&P valve tested to ASME standards (as opposed to CSA)?

The Hubbell water heater is built to and approved by UL to ANSI/UL 174 and CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 110 (1990). These standards require that each assembled water heater be shipped with a factory installed combination temperature and pressure relief valve sized in accordance with ASME requirements. However, if a relief valve sized to CSA is required, you must indicate this at time of requesting a quote for your water heater as this may necessitate a larger opening in the tank to accommodate a larger CSA relief valve. For reference, please see the following link to an article on this subject Here

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What does 3 phase Open Delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any water heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced water heater can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a water heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. The Hubbell model E is available up to a maximum of 12kw in 3 phase open delta wiring. Alternatively, the Hubbell model SE is a balanced 3 phase water heater, meaning that all three legs draw equal amperage. The Model SE is available up to 58kw click here details Model SE

What is the maximum allowable working pressure (psi)?

Hubbell marine shipboard water heaters are designed for a maximum allowable working pressure of 100psi and are supplied with a combination temperature and pressure safety relief valve set at 100ps and 210°F. Please consult with a Hubbell Sales Engineer if you require a higher working pressure rating.

Can I get a 3 phase heater?

Yes. If you plan to operate your water heater with 3 phase power there is a Hubbell marine water heater for you, please go to the following link to view the Hubbell Model MSE 3 phase marine water heater. The model ME is designed to operate using 1 phase power.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

When should I specify an immersion thermostat?

An immersion thermostat should be specified when the desired operating temperature either is below 110F or above 170F, or the water heater is to be used in an unusual application that is outside of the normal operating parameters of a typical domestic water heater. Otherwise, the type of thermostat (surface or immersion) is determined by Hubbell as is appropriate for the kw and storage tank size of the water heater.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model ME                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model MSE

Is a glass lined tank recommended for marine use?

Not in a commercial marine environment. The real cost of a water heater in a marine environment, especially commercial marine, is the cost of replacement. Therefore, it makes economic sense to install a water heater with a long life expectancy. Hence, glass lined water heaters are not the best choice in a marine environment when a cement lined water heater can typically provide 3 times longer life in comparison.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Is American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) approval needed?

Equipment and specifically water heaters for use in commercial marine applications require special construction features to ensure longevity and proper operation in a marine environment. In addition, the water heater must be constructed in conformance to the Code of Federal Regulations USCG 46 CFR Part 53.01 and the pressure vessel must be designed and constructed to the proper ASME code and stamped. A Hubbell marine water heater is manufactured under a Certificate of Manufacturing Assessment as issued by American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Here

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

What is the difference between surface and immersion thermostats?

A surface thermostat is a bi metallic sensing temperature regulating thermostat that senses the outer wall temperature of the water heater tank. An immersion thermostat is a bulb and capillary style temperature regulating thermostat that senses the water temperature through a dry immersion well in the water. A surface thermostat is adjustable up to a maximum of 170oF and an immersion thermostat adjusts up to a maximum of 194oF. A surface thermostat is typically used in low wattage water heaters, whereas an immersion thermostat is used in high wattage water heaters.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What does 3 phase Open Delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any water heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced water heater can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a water heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. The Hubbell model E is available up to a maximum of 12kw in 3 phase open delta wiring. Alternatively, the Hubbell model SE is a balanced 3 phase water heater, meaning that all three legs draw equal amperage. The Model SE is available up to 58kw click here details Model SE

What is the maximum allowable working pressure (psi)?

Hubbell marine shipboard water heaters are designed for a maximum allowable working pressure of 100psi and are supplied with a combination temperature and pressure safety relief valve set at 100ps and 210°F. Please consult with a Hubbell Sales Engineer if you require a higher working pressure rating.

Can I get my water heater made for horizontal installation?

Yes. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model MSH

What third party approvals are available?

The Hubbell water heater is built to both US and Canadian Standards under UL1453 (water heating only) file KSBZ.E239672 or UL834 (boilers and water heating) file BDJS.E51660. In addition, the Hubbell pressure vessel storage tank is built and stamped to ASME and National Board Registered. Other approvals are available upon request at the time of quoting, including CRN (Canadian Registration Number), NR-13 (Brazilian Regulation Standard Boilers and Pressure Vessels), ABS (American Bureau of Shipping), SASO (Saudi Arabia Standards Organization) and others. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss your third party approval requirements.

Is a glass lined tank recommended for marine use?

Not in a commercial marine environment. The real cost of a water heater in a marine environment, especially commercial marine, is the cost of replacement. Therefore, it makes economic sense to install a water heater with a long life expectancy. Hence, glass lined water heaters are not the best choice in a marine environment when a cement lined water heater can typically provide 3 times longer life in comparison.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

Is American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) approval needed?

Equipment and specifically water heaters for use in commercial marine applications require special construction features to ensure longevity and proper operation in a marine environment. In addition, the water heater must be constructed in conformance to the Code of Federal Regulations USCG 46 CFR Part 53.01 and the pressure vessel must be designed and constructed to the proper ASME code and stamped. A Hubbell marine water heater is manufactured under a Certificate of Manufacturing Assessment as issued by American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Here

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Can a cement lined tank be repaired in the field?

Yes, it is possible to repair a cement lined tank in the field. In the event the cement lining is damaged, it is easily repaired in the field by maintenance personnel (no specialized training required) using readily available materials.

What NEMA rating is right for my application?

Hubbell water heaters are available with a wide range NEMA ratings for the electrical control cabinet and enclosures. In non-hazardous locations, the most common enclosure and Hubbell’s standard is NEMA 1 which is constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt). Other common NEMA ratings selected for Hubbell water heaters are NEMA 4, 4X and 12. NEMA 4 enclosures are constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow, splashing water, and hose directed water); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure. NEMA 4X is identical to NEMA 4 except the enclosure is constructed from corrosion resistant material (typically stainless steel). NEMA 12 enclosures are constructed (without knockouts) for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flings); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing). For a detailed description of NEMA enclosure ratings as well as a chart for converting NEMA enclosure type ratings to IEC 60529 Enclosure Classification Designations (IP Ratings) please go to Here

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What is the maximum allowable working pressure (psi)?

Hubbell marine shipboard water heaters are designed for a maximum allowable working pressure of 100psi and are supplied with a combination temperature and pressure safety relief valve set at 100ps and 210°F. Please consult with a Hubbell Sales Engineer if you require a higher working pressure rating.

What is the delivery time?

In most cases the delivery time for a Hubbell water heater is approximately 10 weeks after release for production, but can be 16 weeks or more depending upon the particular requirements of your application. However, there are various sizes and configurations which Hubbell has in stock for “Quick Ship” (as early as next day t to 2 weeks) to accommodate situations that require shorter delivery. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss delivery times for your application.

Are parts available from the factory?

Yes. All replacement parts for the Hubbell water heater are available from the factory. Please call 800-647-3165 and ask for our parts department. Please have your model and serial number handy. Most parts are in stock and orders placed before noon typically ship same day. However, it should be noted that the heating element component is typically not a stock item, with delivery times ranging from 2 to 10 weeks depending upon the design, it is recommended that you consider having a replacement heating element on hand if your application is critical.

Can I get my water heater made for horizontal installation?

Yes. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Why would I want a copper alloy tank for my application?

If your marine application demands the longest life and most reliable operation, then you should consider a solid copper alloy tank for your water heater. This type of tank is constructed from 90/10 copper nickel (or copper silicon 655) alloy for maximum longevity. This copper alloy is highly corrosion resistant even at elevated water temperature and has the most desirable characteristics for use as a water heater tank. This construction is intended to last the life of your ship, and as a result is likely to have the lowest total cost of ownership over th life of the ship when one considers the tremendous cost for removing and replacing a lined steel water heater. Ship owners know all too well the real cost involved of cutting out and replacing equipment. Therefore, the owner motivated to provide the lowest total cost of ownership water heater will benefit when the onboard water heater is specified as copper alloy.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model MTX

Does the Hubbell electric tankless water heater restrict water flow?

No. Hubbell electric tankless water heaters do not restrict water flow. Other brands may incorporate a flow restrictor device within their tankless heater or require a flow restricting device be installed in the plumbing or fixture itself as a method for controlling temperature. This is not the case for Hubbell electric tankless water heaters.

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Is American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) approval needed?

Equipment and specifically water heaters for use in commercial marine applications require special construction features to ensure longevity and proper operation in a marine environment. In addition, the water heater must be constructed in conformance to the Code of Federal Regulations USCG 46 CFR Part 53.01 and the pressure vessel must be designed and constructed to the proper ASME code and stamped. A Hubbell marine water heater is manufactured under a Certificate of Manufacturing Assessment as issued by American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Here

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

How is a tankless heater different from a storage tank heater?

A storage tank water heater maintains a tank full of hot water 24/7/365 and will heat water even during periods of no usage in order to make up for standby heat loss. A tankless water heater only consumes power (whether its gas or electric) when there is demand for hot water. They take up significantly less space and typically can be located close to the point of use, thus providing more efficient delivery of hot water. Tankless water heaters provide continuous hot water and never run out as long as the heater capacity is not exceeded.

What is the life expectancy of the Hubbell tankless water heater?

Depending on the type of installation, usage and water quality, the Hubbell electric tankless water heater can last from 15 to 25 years. In a typical application when properly maintained a Hubbell electric tankless water heater should have no problem lasting 25 years or more.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Can my tankless heater serve a fixture that has an anti-scald valve?

Yes. However, it should be noted that a tankless water heating system is generally set to a “just right” temperature, unlike traditional storage tank water heaters which generally overheat the water and require mixing down to achieve a “just right” temperature. Therefore, with a tankless heater you may have to adjust the anti scalding valve to the maximum setting due to the delivery of “just right” temperature water to the shower valve.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Will I get instant hot water with a tankless water heater?

This is a common misconception of tankless water heaters. A tankless water heater does heat water on-demand instantly. Just like a tank water heater, it still takes the same amount of time for the hot water to travel through the pipes and flush out the standing water that has cooled down and is already inside the hot water plumbing. No matter what type of heater is installed, it will always take time for the hot water to travel through the plumbing before arriving at the fixture. The length of time it takes always depends on the length of the pipes, the amount of flow through the fixture and the water pressure. In general, a centralized water heater will require the most time to deliver hot water to the fixture, whereas a Point-of-Use water heater will deliver hot water to the fixture in the shortest amount of time.

How small is the Hubbell electric tankless water heater?

About the size of an average briefcase. The Hubbell tankless water heaters are a fraction of the size of a conventional storage tank type water heater and they mount on the wall, so you can reclaim 100% of the floor space once occupied by your conventional water heater.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

Can the standard Hubbell tankless water heater be installed outside?

No. However, Hubbell does off a electric tankless model with NEMA 4 construction and suitable for outdoor installation, please see Hubbell model TX at Here

What temperature should the tankless heater be set to?

The Hubbell electric tankless water heater can be configured by the user to operate in any of three different ranges. Low temperature range is 32-104°F, Standard range is 32-140°F and High Temperature range is 32-194°F. The operator can field configure the electronic controller to operate in any of these ranges, and can then select a set temperature within the selected range that is appropriate for the application. The controller is also field configurable for either °F or °C operation and visual display

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

What is the difference between gas & electric tankless water heaters?

The most obvious difference between gas and electric tankless water heaters is the energy source that is used. Gas tankless heaters use either Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG), but also use electricity (120v) to power an internal fan and other controls. Electric tankless heaters operate using only electricity. Electric tankless water heaters operate at higher energy efficiency, in the case of Hubbell the thermal efficiency is 98%+, compared to gas tankless which ranges from Energy Factor ratings of 0.82 to 0.96 depending upon model. Electric tankless is more efficient in large part because gas tankless models operate by burning gas, which is harder to control than electricity and is less efficient due to heat lost in the flue exhaust. Gas heaters require exhaust and/or fresh air intake venting, whereas electric heaters do not. Please note that efficiency and operating cost are two different things, to determine operating cost one must consider their cost of energy and usage in addition to the operating efficiency of the heater. Gas tankless water heaters cost more to purchase compared to electric tankless heaters. When replacing a storage tank type water heater with a tankless heater, it should be noted that both gas and electric tankless require changes to the existing plumbing and wiring of the tank they are replacing. When installing a new gas tankless heater, most installations will require a new/upgraded venting and gas line. When installing a new electric tankless heater, most installations will require upgraded wiring to the heater and replacement of the circuit breakers in the electrical panel. The largest available residential and light duty commercial gas tankless water heater is 199,000 BTU/Hr, but the most common size has an output of about 123,000 BTU/Hr. After factoring for energy efficiency, this is equivalent to roughly 36 kW. By contrast, the largest residential/light duty commercial electric tankless water heater is 27 kW, which has an effective output of 91,000 BTU/Hr. In terms of operation and maintenance, a gas tankless heater is considerably more complicated to maintain and service compared to electric tankless. In addition, an electric tankless heater will provide more accurate and consistent hot water temperature throughout a full range of flow rates compared to a gas tankless heater. However, gas tankless heaters because they are available in larger BTU sizes can provide a higher hot water flow rate/temperature rise for very large installations compared to a standard electric tankless heater.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Does my tankless water heater need a T&P relief valve?

Yes and no. NEC paragraph 422-27 requires all water heaters to be equipped with a temperature limiting device in addition to its control thermostat with the exception of instantaneous water heaters identified as being suitable for such use and with a capacity of 4L (1 gallon) or less. Hubbell tankless heaters are have a capacity of less than 1 gallon and are listed to UL Standard 499 which is recognized by NEC and thus meet the requirements of this exception. However individual state and/or local plumbing codes, such as Massachusetts and Kentucky, may require the installation of a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. Therefore Hubbell recommends checking state and local plumbing codes for verification.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model Packaged Skid

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

Does Hubbell offer DNV certification?

Yes. Hubbell marine water heaters come standard with ABS Type Approval, but and are also available on request with other third party approvals including DNV, BV or NR-13.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model PBX

Why choose a HPWH versus a standard electric water heater?

HPWH’s are the latest technology in water heating and provide the highest efficiency available for heating water. As a comparison, the Hubbell high efficiency 50 gallon electric water heater is estimated to cost $508 per year to operate, whereas the Hubbell model PBX heat pump water heater is estimated to cost $201 per year, a savings of $307 annually. So, from an operating cost standpoint, the advantage of a HPWH is clear. However, other factors need to be considered when deciding HPWH versus electric water heater. One major factor is the initial total installed cost of the heater, with a heat pump water heater approximately 2-3 times higher cost compared to a traditional electric water heater. Compared to a standard electric water heater a HPWH is a more challenging and therefore more expensive installation, has more restrictions with respect to installation conditions and is newer technology and therefore to a certain degree less proven and more challenging to service. Having said that, a HPWH is by far the most efficient method for heating water and deserves careful consideration if it is right for your application.

What is the difference between a Hybrid and a Heat Pump Water Heater?

These terms are interchangeable and refer to the same type of heater. The term “Hybrid” arose when manufacturer’s combined standard type electric water heaters with a heat pump to create a new type of water heater. This new type of water heater includes both electric resistance heating and heat pump technologies, and therefore the term Hybrid water heater was coined. However, the marketplace is also calling this new type of water heater a Heat Pump Water Heater even though it includes resistance heaters. The only time when a heat pump water heater would not be considered a hybrid is if it did not include any form of electric resistance heater. The Hubbell model PBX water heater is comprised of both resistance heaters and a heat pump system, and therefore is considered a hybrid, although as noted above is also referred to simply as a heat pump water heater

Where can I install a heat pump water heater?

Heat pump water heaters can be installed in a variety of locations, from a garage to a heated utility room. Things to consider include space, sound, cold air, and size/height. For more information, visit Here.

How does a Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH) water heater work?

The heat pump removes a small amount of heat from the surrounding air, heats the water and moves the cooler air back into the room. The Hubbell model PBX Heat Pump Water Heater produces the same amount of hot water as a traditional electric water heater, but with greater efficiency. Think of the HPWH as a refrigerator working in reverse. Just as a refrigerator removes heat from its enclosed interior and releases the heat into the surrounding kitchen, a HPWH takes heat from the surrounding air and transfers that heat into the water of the tank. These things are normal with a Hubbell HPWH: It is normal for cool air to blow out the vents on the back cover of the water heater. The air is moved through the water heater by a fan located within the heat pump enclosure on the top of the water heater. You will hear the sound of this fan pulling the air through the heat pump system. As the water heater determines the right amount of energy needed to heat the water the fans will change speed and the sound will increase and decrease. For a detailed discussion regarding HPWH’s please go Here.

What type of maintenance does a heat pump water heater require?

Unlike standard electric water heaters, heat pump water heaters use an air filter. These filters need to be cleaned to ensure efficient operation. In addition, a HPWH generates condensate which must be plumbed to a proper drain. This condensate drain may be gravity or pump assisted, and in both cases needs to be periodically inspected and cleaned to ensure proper drainage. Other maintenance needs are similar to standard electric water heaters.

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Is a heat pump water heater right for where I live?

When selecting a heat pump water heater model it is important to take your climate into consideration. Some climates experience freezing temperatures; water heaters installed in these climates in unheated locations require protection from freezing and other additional safety and performance features. The Northern Climate Specification Qualified Products List will help you find the right heat pump water heater for your location, for details click here Northern Climate Report

What rebates are available for a heat pump water heater?

Check our rebates and tax credits page at Here for a list of available rebates and tax credits before installing a new heat pump water heater. There may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency Here and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What sound is generated by the Hubbell Heat Pump Water Heater?

It depends on which operating mode the HPWH is set to. There are a total of five (5) operating modes available: Economy, Hybrid, Electric, Super and Vacation. The Hubbell HPWH makes no sound when in Electric or Vacation mode. If Economy, Hybrid or Super mode is selected the Hubbell HPWH will make noise as the fan operates and pulls air through the heat pump. If the Hubbell HPWH electronic controller detects any fault condition it will make a beeping sound and display an error code.

Why does cold air blow from the heater?

Cold air will blow from the water heater any time it is operating utilizing the heat pump. The heat pump works by using a small amount of the heat from the surrounding air to heat the water in the tank. The by-product of the heat pump system is cold air, the warm air is pulled through the system fan to heat the water, then the remaining cooler air is moved out the side of the heater.

Can I stop cold air or fan noise?

You can temporarily stop the cold air and fan noise coming from the water heater by pressing the FAN OFF button. During this period of time the water heater will operate in Electric mode, thereby preventing the fan from operating. You can adjust the length of time this feature.

What is the Energy Factor (EF) rating?

The Energy Factor (EF) rating represents the efficiency of the water heater. The higher the EF, the more efficient the water heater unit. The Hubbell Model PBX heat pump water heaters are classified by the Department of Energy as residential water heaters and are rated by an Energy Factor (EF) ranging from 2.2 to 2.35 depending upon the model size you select. Please note that the use of R values as a measure of efficiency is incomplete and does therefore does not accurately capture a water heater’s true efficiency as does the EF rating. For additional information check out the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) website at Here as well as the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) website at Here

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model PBX                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model PS

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model PS                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model SE

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

When should I specify an immersion thermostat?

An immersion thermostat should be specified when the desired operating temperature either is below 110F or above 170F, or the water heater is to be used in an unusual application that is outside of the normal operating parameters of a typical domestic water heater. Otherwise, the type of thermostat (surface or immersion) is determined by Hubbell as is appropriate for the kw and storage tank size of the water heater.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Can a timer be installed on my Hubbell water heater?

Water heater timers are devices that provide automatic control of electric water heaters. They can be programmed to turn a water heater off or on at times typically set by your local utility. Your local electric utility may have in place an “Off-Peak” or Time-of-Use (TOU) rates which offer a customer the incentive to consume power during certain periods of the day. The Hubbell Model E is available with various timer control options, ranging from programmable 7 day timers to utility specific devices that control the water heater.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the difference between surface and immersion thermostats?

A surface thermostat is a bi metallic sensing temperature regulating thermostat that senses the outer wall temperature of the water heater tank. An immersion thermostat is a bulb and capillary style temperature regulating thermostat that senses the water temperature through a dry immersion well in the water. A surface thermostat is adjustable up to a maximum of 170oF and an immersion thermostat adjusts up to a maximum of 194oF. A surface thermostat is typically used in low wattage water heaters, whereas an immersion thermostat is used in high wattage water heaters.

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What does 3 phase Open Delta wiring mean to me?

Without getting into a lengthy discourse on electricity, the simple answer is that any water heater internally wired in a 3 phase open delta configuration is unbalanced, meaning that the amperage drawn by one of the three legs is high and unequal to the other two legs. This unbalanced water heater can have a detrimental effect on a buildings power system and therefore needs to be carefully understood before you install a water heater configured for 3 phase open delta. It should be noted that the branch circuit protection (i.e. circuit breaker) servicing a 3 phase open delta water heater needs to be sized for the high amperage leg. The Hubbell model E is available up to a maximum of 12kw in 3 phase open delta wiring. Alternatively, the Hubbell model SE is a balanced 3 phase water heater, meaning that all three legs draw equal amperage. The Model SE is available up to 58kw click here details Model SE

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model SE                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model SH/H

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What third party approvals are available?

The Hubbell water heater is built to both US and Canadian Standards under UL1453 (water heating only) file KSBZ.E239672 or UL834 (boilers and water heating) file BDJS.E51660. In addition, the Hubbell pressure vessel storage tank is built and stamped to ASME and National Board Registered. Other approvals are available upon request at the time of quoting, including CRN (Canadian Registration Number), NR-13 (Brazilian Regulation Standard Boilers and Pressure Vessels), ABS (American Bureau of Shipping), SASO (Saudi Arabia Standards Organization) and others. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss your third party approval requirements.

What is the delivery time?

In most cases the delivery time for a Hubbell water heater is approximately 10 weeks after release for production, but can be 16 weeks or more depending upon the particular requirements of your application. However, there are various sizes and configurations which Hubbell has in stock for “Quick Ship” (as early as next day t to 2 weeks) to accommodate situations that require shorter delivery. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss delivery times for your application.

Are parts available from the factory?

Yes. All replacement parts for the Hubbell water heater are available from the factory. Please call 800-647-3165 and ask for our parts department. Please have your model and serial number handy. Most parts are in stock and orders placed before noon typically ship same day. However, it should be noted that the heating element component is typically not a stock item, with delivery times ranging from 2 to 10 weeks depending upon the design, it is recommended that you consider having a replacement heating element on hand if your application is critical.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Can a timer be installed on my Hubbell water heater?

Water heater timers are devices that provide automatic control of electric water heaters. They can be programmed to turn a water heater off or on at times typically set by your local utility. Your local electric utility may have in place an “Off-Peak” or Time-of-Use (TOU) rates which offer a customer the incentive to consume power during certain periods of the day. The Hubbell Model E is available with various timer control options, ranging from programmable 7 day timers to utility specific devices that control the water heater.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

What is the average life of an electric water heater?

The most important factor related to the life expectancy of a water heater is the quality and type of storage tank. On an average the life expectancy of a glass lined electric water heater is about 10-12 years (according to the National Association of Home Builders 2007 Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentID=99359 ), compared to a cement lined electric water heater’s average life expectancy of 23-26 years (Independent study of over 25,000 installations for an Electric Utility). Of course, there are various other factors that affect longevity including pressure fluctuations, usage, water conditions, environmental conditions, etc.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Can a cement lined tank be repaired in the field?

Yes, it is possible to repair a cement lined tank in the field. In the event the cement lining is damaged, it is easily repaired in the field by maintenance personnel (no specialized training required) using readily available materials.

What NEMA rating is right for my application?

Hubbell water heaters are available with a wide range NEMA ratings for the electrical control cabinet and enclosures. In non-hazardous locations, the most common enclosure and Hubbell’s standard is NEMA 1 which is constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt). Other common NEMA ratings selected for Hubbell water heaters are NEMA 4, 4X and 12. NEMA 4 enclosures are constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow, splashing water, and hose directed water); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure. NEMA 4X is identical to NEMA 4 except the enclosure is constructed from corrosion resistant material (typically stainless steel). NEMA 12 enclosures are constructed (without knockouts) for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flings); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing). For a detailed description of NEMA enclosure ratings as well as a chart for converting NEMA enclosure type ratings to IEC 60529 Enclosure Classification Designations (IP Ratings) please go to Here

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

Can I use this model in a marine application?

No. There are specific third party approvals and design features required for a marine grade water heater. Hubbell has marine shipboard models available, please go to the Hubbell model MSH at Here

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model SH/H                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model SLN

What is OG-300?

OG-300 is a solar thermal system rating given by the Solar Rating & Certification Corporation (SRCC). OG-300 verifies the total system performance and safety, and is required by some states and organizations in order to collect renewable energy incentives.

Is the Hubbell heater OG-300 approved?

The Hubbell solar tank is manufactured by Hubbell’s wholly owned subsidiary company, which is OG-300 certified with both AET and Apricus systems.

Can I get solar panels with my Hubbell heater?

No. Hubbell focuses on designing and building the most efficient and long lasting solar water heater only. The ancillary solar system components must be purchased separately.

Are state or federal tax credits available?

Federal tax credits are available on solar water heaters, whether performing upgrades or maintenance on an existing system or installing new. Save all receipts- including labor bills, arborist invoices (if necessary/ applicable) etc. and use the total amount to complete IRS Form 5695 when filing your taxes, and affix a copy to your form 1040 or 1040NR. For more information about state and municipal energy credits, visitHere

Why do I need a back up electric immersion heater in my solar tank?

Depending on the application, number of solar panels, etc. one may not actually need a backup electrical element. Generally speaking, the electrical elements are present in the tank to ensure the continuous supply of hot water in the event of prolonged cloudiness (resulting in much less solar contribution to the tank), temporary increases in hot water demand such as holiday gatherings, and the like.

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model SLN                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model ST

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

What is the delivery time?

In most cases the delivery time for a Hubbell water heater is approximately 10 weeks after release for production, but can be 16 weeks or more depending upon the particular requirements of your application. However, there are various sizes and configurations which Hubbell has in stock for “Quick Ship” (as early as next day t to 2 weeks) to accommodate situations that require shorter delivery. Please consult with your Hubbell Sales Engineer to discuss delivery times for your application.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

What hi-limit control is provided for an over-temperature condition?

Hubbell provides a solenoid safety system for over-temperature situations. An aquastat senses the over-temperature condition and trips a solenoid which shunts the steam supply to the water heater. For semi-instantaneous water heaters (STX and BWX models) Hubbell provides an additional solenoid (aptly named a double solenoid) system to shunt the steam from entering the heating coil and to dump over heated water in the vessel to drain. For storage water heaters (ST and BW models) Hubbell provides a single solenoid system to shunt the steam supply to the heating coil thus preventing further over heating. A storage tank water heater does not typically include a second soeloid to dump the over heated water to drain due to the large volume of water that would need to be drained which could potentially exceed the capacity of the local drain.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

What type and size relief valve should be installed on my equipment?

The type of relief valve to be installed depends on the intended purpose of the equipment (heater or storage vessel), the medium (steam, air/gas, or liquid), the design temperature of the medium, the vessel code of construction (ASME Section I, IV, or VIII), and local plumbing codes. Local plumbing code take precedence. For more information see the following PDF flowchart here. The sizing of a relief valve depends on the desired operating pressure (not to exceed the rated pressure of the vessel), the type of relief valve (applicable ASME Code compliance as determined above), the medium in the vessel, the required relieving capacity (based on heat input, mass flow rate, or volumetric flow rate), and the relief valve manufacturer's specifications. When supplied with the above information, Hubbell can recommend a manufacturer's model and size.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model ST                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model STX

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

The heater will be installed in Canada, what is CRN?

All provinces of Canada have adopted the ASME Code and require vessels to be stamped with a provincial registration number in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Before construction begins, one requirement has to be met in all provinces of Canada. We must submit blueprints and specification sheets in triplicate of all designs for approval and registration by the chief inspector of the province in which the vessel is to be used. After the chief inspector receives the drawings, they are checked by an engineer to determine their compliance with the Code and also with provincial regulations. A CRN number is assigned and must be stamped on the vessel in addition to the ASME symbol and National Board stamping. Once the design has been approved and registered, any number of vessels of that design can be built and used in the province where it was approved. This process is repeated for each province. The Canadian provinces also require their own manufacturer's affidavit form, with the registration number and the shop inspector's signature on the data sheets. Finally, when a vessel is delivered to a purchaser in Canada, an affidavit of manufacturer bearing registration number and the signature of the authorized shop inspector must be sent to the chief inspector of the province for which it is intended.

What hi-limit control is provided for an over-temperature condition?

Hubbell provides a solenoid safety system for over-temperature situations. An aquastat senses the over-temperature condition and trips a solenoid which shunts the steam supply to the water heater. For semi-instantaneous water heaters (STX and BWX models) Hubbell provides an additional solenoid (aptly named a double solenoid) system to shunt the steam from entering the heating coil and to dump over heated water in the vessel to drain. For storage water heaters (ST and BW models) Hubbell provides a single solenoid system to shunt the steam supply to the heating coil thus preventing further over heating. A storage tank water heater does not typically include a second soeloid to dump the over heated water to drain due to the large volume of water that would need to be drained which could potentially exceed the capacity of the local drain.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

Back to Model STX                                         All Products FAQs Index

Model Tankless

What is the difference between gas & electric tankless water heaters?

The most obvious difference between gas and electric tankless water heaters is the energy source that is used. Gas tankless heaters use either Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG), but also use electricity (120v) to power an internal fan and other controls. Electric tankless heaters operate using only electricity. Electric tankless water heaters operate at higher energy efficiency, in the case of Hubbell the thermal efficiency is 98%+, compared to gas tankless which ranges from Energy Factor ratings of 0.82 to 0.96 depending upon model. Electric tankless is more efficient in large part because gas tankless models operate by burning gas, which is harder to control than electricity and is less efficient due to heat lost in the flue exhaust. Gas heaters require exhaust and/or fresh air intake venting, whereas electric heaters do not. Please note that efficiency and operating cost are two different things, to determine operating cost one must consider their cost of energy and usage in addition to the operating efficiency of the heater. Gas tankless water heaters cost more to purchase compared to electric tankless heaters. When replacing a storage tank type water heater with a tankless heater, it should be noted that both gas and electric tankless require changes to the existing plumbing and wiring of the tank they are replacing. When installing a new gas tankless heater, most installations will require a new/upgraded venting and gas line. When installing a new electric tankless heater, most installations will require upgraded wiring to the heater and replacement of the circuit breakers in the electrical panel. The largest available residential and light duty commercial gas tankless water heater is 199,000 BTU/Hr, but the most common size has an output of about 123,000 BTU/Hr. After factoring for energy efficiency, this is equivalent to roughly 36 kW. By contrast, the largest residential/light duty commercial electric tankless water heater is 27 kW, which has an effective output of 91,000 BTU/Hr. In terms of operation and maintenance, a gas tankless heater is considerably more complicated to maintain and service compared to electric tankless. In addition, an electric tankless heater will provide more accurate and consistent hot water temperature throughout a full range of flow rates compared to a gas tankless heater. However, gas tankless heaters because they are available in larger BTU sizes can provide a higher hot water flow rate/temperature rise for very large installations compared to a standard electric tankless heater.

Will I get instant hot water with a tankless water heater?

This is a common misconception of tankless water heaters. A tankless water heater does heat water on-demand instantly. Just like a tank water heater, it still takes the same amount of time for the hot water to travel through the pipes and flush out the standing water that has cooled down and is already inside the hot water plumbing. No matter what type of heater is installed, it will always take time for the hot water to travel through the plumbing before arriving at the fixture. The length of time it takes always depends on the length of the pipes, the amount of flow through the fixture and the water pressure. In general, a centralized water heater will require the most time to deliver hot water to the fixture, whereas a Point-of-Use water heater will deliver hot water to the fixture in the shortest amount of time.

How is a tankless heater different from a storage tank heater?

A storage tank water heater maintains a tank full of hot water 24/7/365 and will heat water even during periods of no usage in order to make up for standby heat loss. A tankless water heater only consumes power (whether its gas or electric) when there is demand for hot water. They take up significantly less space and typically can be located close to the point of use, thus providing more efficient delivery of hot water. Tankless water heaters provide continuous hot water and never run out as long as the heater capacity is not exceeded.

Does the Hubbell electric tankless water heater restrict water flow?

No. Hubbell electric tankless water heaters do not restrict water flow. Other brands may incorporate a flow restrictor device within their tankless heater or require a flow restricting device be installed in the plumbing or fixture itself as a method for controlling temperature. This is not the case for Hubbell electric tankless water heaters.

Is Tankless right for my application?

It depends. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space and weight saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water. Tankless water heaters do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow and temperature rise for the application. Therefore, before proceeding with a tankless heater you must carefully understand your application and review your available power. Hubbell offers a wide range of electric tankless marine heaters go to Electric Tankless for details. It is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater.

Are any Federal, State, local or utility incentives available?

Depending upon your location and the type of water heater you select for your application, there may be financial incentives offered by local, state or federal government and/or your local utility. By visiting the following website at Incentives and clicking on your state, you may find available rebates and incentives.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Can my tankless heater serve a fixture that has an anti-scald valve?

Yes. However, it should be noted that a tankless water heating system is generally set to a “just right” temperature, unlike traditional storage tank water heaters which generally overheat the water and require mixing down to achieve a “just right” temperature. Therefore, with a tankless heater you may have to adjust the anti scalding valve to the maximum setting due to the delivery of “just right” temperature water to the shower valve.

What is the life expectancy of the Hubbell tankless water heater?

Depending on the type of installation, usage and water quality, the Hubbell electric tankless water heater can last from 15 to 25 years. In a typical application when properly maintained a Hubbell electric tankless water heater should have no problem lasting 25 years or more.

How small is the Hubbell electric tankless water heater?

About the size of an average briefcase. The Hubbell tankless water heaters are a fraction of the size of a conventional storage tank type water heater and they mount on the wall, so you can reclaim 100% of the floor space once occupied by your conventional water heater.

Can the standard Hubbell tankless water heater be installed outside?

No. However, Hubbell does off a electric tankless model with NEMA 4 construction and suitable for outdoor installation, please see Hubbell model TX at Here

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

What temperature should the tankless heater be set to?

The Hubbell electric tankless water heater can be configured by the user to operate in any of three different ranges. Low temperature range is 32-104°F, Standard range is 32-140°F and High Temperature range is 32-194°F. The operator can field configure the electronic controller to operate in any of these ranges, and can then select a set temperature within the selected range that is appropriate for the application. The controller is also field configurable for either °F or °C operation and visual display

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Does my tankless water heater need a T&P relief valve?

Yes and no. NEC paragraph 422-27 requires all water heaters to be equipped with a temperature limiting device in addition to its control thermostat with the exception of instantaneous water heaters identified as being suitable for such use and with a capacity of 4L (1 gallon) or less. Hubbell tankless heaters are have a capacity of less than 1 gallon and are listed to UL Standard 499 which is recognized by NEC and thus meet the requirements of this exception. However individual state and/or local plumbing codes, such as Massachusetts and Kentucky, may require the installation of a temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. Therefore Hubbell recommends checking state and local plumbing codes for verification.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model Transflow

Why is Hydrastone Cement a better choice over glass lining?

Cement lining provides guaranteed 100% coverage with a minimum thickness of 0.5” over all internal tank surfaces. In comparison, glass lining is approximately 0.005” thick and includes imperfections, pinholes and variation in coverage thickness resulting in portions of unprotected steel tank exposed to corrosion. In an attempt to compensate, glass lined tanks include a sacrificial anode in an effort to slow down the corrosion of the tank. Cement lined tanks on the other hand do not require an anode due to the integrity of the lining. As such, a cement lined tank will far outlast a glass lined tank. For a more complete explanation of the benefits of the Hubbell cement lining please click on the following link Cement Lining

Why is dielectric isolation so important?

The unique design of the Hubbell heat exchanger electrically isolates the heat exchanger from the tank by means of a non conductive barrier installed between the two. This provides dielectric isolation between the tank and the heat exchanger thereby eliminating electrolysis between the two due to dissimilar metals. This feature is one reason why the Hubbell indirect water heater far outlasts competitor models.

Why is a cement lined tank a better choice than stainless steel tank?

In almost all cases, a cement lined steel tank is a more robust tank compared to stainless steel. The weakness of a stainless steel tank is in the materials susceptibility to SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) caused by chlorides, bromides, iodides and fluorides in the water. The combination of residual stresses from welding, roll forming and stamping, and the cyclic stress from operating in a hot water system are sources of tensile stress, that when above a certain threshold stress, will make a stainless steel water heater tank susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Cement lined steel tanks are not susceptible to this condition, and therefore are more resistant to corrosion and withstand the pressure and temperature cyclical operation of a water heater.

Is the Hubbell heat exchanger removable?

Yes. The heat exchanger is fully removable in all Hubbell Model T Transflow indirect water heaters. The benefit to having a removable heat exchanger is that the coil can be removed for cleaning and de-scaling for improved performance and efficiency when used in hard water applications. It should be noted that the heat exchanger is not removable and the coil cannot be cleaned in many other indirect water heater brands.

What electrical power do I need for the thermostat?

The thermostat is powered directly from the 24 volt from the boiler T-T.

How does the heat trap work?

The Hubbell water heater is constructed with a heat trap installed within the water heater’s hot water outlet connection. This device helps prevent heat from escaping through the storage tank’s hot water outlet during standby periods, resulting in improved operating efficiency. The heat trap is constructed from a specially designed bronze nipple with an internal floating ball that during standby periods of no flow settles and closes off the storage tank thereby preventing thermal conduction of hot water radiating through the hot water outlet.

What temperature should I set my water heater?

For typical domestic potable hot water service the temperature of your water heater at 125°F is sufficient. This prevents wasted energy (which means cost savings for you) and also decreases the possibility of scalding water burns. If you run out of hot water on this setting, increase the temperature by five degrees incrementally until your hot water needs are met. The goal is to have the temperature set just high enough to meet your needs but within safe operating parameters. Please note that a water heater in and of itself should not be relied upon as the ultimate temperature controlling source for the hot water delivered to your fixtures. Please consult local and state codes for installation of the proper and code approved (ASSE 1016, 1070, 1017) mixing devices to achieve the safe delivery of hot water to the fixtures. For a more complete information please download the whitepaper PDF titled "Understanding Potential Water Heater Scald Hazards" developed by ASSE at the following link ASSE Whitepaper

Do I need to install an insulation blanket?

No. Most new electric water heaters are highly efficient with respect to the amount of heat loss radiating from the storage tank. This is due to the use of “blown in” polyurethane foam insulation as the insulating method for modern tanks, compared to the fiberglass blanket style insulation used by water heater manufacturer’s largely in the past. As such there is little to no benefit, and very possibly a detrimental effect to efficiency, installing an insulation blanket on a new electric water heater constructed with foam insulation.

Is it OK to use softened water with my cement lined tank?

Yes it is OK. A water softener system will not affect the longevity or operation of a Hubbell cement lined water heater tank. A water softener is typically installed when a potable water system has hard water resulting in the need to soften the water. Unfortunately, the salt used in a water softener corrodes the anode rod and exposed steel surfaces of the water heater tank, rapidly causing a glass lined water heater to corrode and leak within a few years. This is an issue for a glass lined water heater due to its reliance on a sacrificial anode, however because a cement lined tank does not use a sacrificial anode softened water is of no concern to the Hubbell cement lined tank.

What is a sacrificial anode and does a cement lined tank need one?

All water heaters constructed using a steel tank requires a lining to protect the internal steel surfaces from corrosion. Certain linings (i.e. glass and epoxy), due to their nature, have unavoidable holes and imperfections resulting in exposure of the steel tank. As a result of this deficiency, the manufacturer will install an anode rod(s) in an attempt to delay corrosion of the steel tank. An anode rod is typically made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc, is a maintenance item that requires periodic inspection and replacement, and is often times the cause of a “rotten egg” odor to your hot water. Often referred to as a sacrificial anode rod because, over time, it slowly dissolves, sacrificing itself as it is attacked by aggressive substances in the water which would otherwise attack the steel tank through the pinholes and imperfections of the glass or epoxy lining. A cement lined steel tank on the other hand does not require an anode because of the thickness and guaranteed 100% coverage of the cement lining over all internal surfaces of the steel tank. This eliminates the need for an anode rod in a cement lined water heater, resulting in a significantly longer life compared to a glass or epoxy lined water heater. For a further discussion please click on the following link Cement Lining

What is the max water temperature setting?

The Hubbell cement lined tank is suitable for storing water up to 194°F. However, it should be noted that your water heater will likely require optional control accessories to achieve this temperature, but there is no concern regarding the ability of the lining to withstand this temperature. Additionally, there are numerous safety concerns that must be considered when storing water at elevated temperature, please consult factory.

Which is better for me, a tankless or storage type water heater?

It depends. A tankless water heater is sometimes referred to as a Point-of-Use (POU) or instantaneous water heater. Due to the relative small physical size of a tankless water heater compared to a storage tank water heater, a tankless option can be advantageous from a space saving perspective and can sometimes be installed closer to where you want hot water (hence the term POU). However, tankless heaters are not suited for many applications, so it is critical that before choosing to go tankless you have carefully considered all of the factors that sometimes make the tankless option more complicated and risky compared to a storage type water heater. In particular, you should understand the operational characteristics, maintenance requirements, reparability, and sometimes significant installation requirements of a tankless water heater before making a decision. Tankless units do not store heated water like a storage type water heater; they only heat water as there is demand and therefore must be sized to meet the maximum flow for the application. In some cases a tankless water heater may improve operating efficiency, but possibly at the expense of user comfort. Hubbell tankless water heaters are available in Electric Tankless or Gas Tankless

What is the water pressure drop through the tank?

There is no major restriction of water flow through the Hubbell water heater. Cold water inlet and hot water outlet sizes are available in ¾” and 1-1/2” sizes to accommodate your application. By far, the ¾” size is more than adequate for most applications using a model E water heater. If your flow rate through the water heater is greater than approximately 10 GPM you may want to consider the 1-1/2” connection option (must be specified at time of ordering). As an approximate, pressure drop through any E model water heater with ¾” connections will be <4 psi with a flow rate of <10 GPM, and with 1-1/2” connections the pressure drop will be <3 psi with a flow rate of <20 GPM.

Do I need a drain pan under my heater?

Yes, Hubbell advises that a drip pan with a proper drainage connection be installed under your water heater. In some locations drip pans are required by code and in other situations they are highly recommended, but not required. In either case, if a water heater leak or a dripping relief valve could result in property damage then a drip pan must be installed under the water heater, even when not required by code.

Is there a cold water dip tube in the Hubbell tank?

Not exactly. The Hubbell cement lined tank includes a cold water diffuser integrated into the cold water connection which allows incoming cold water to be introduced into the tank in a controlled and non turbulent manner, thus avoiding premature mixing of cold water with the hot water in the tank. On Hubbell cement lined tanks the cold water inlet/diffuser is located on the side in the lower portion of the tank. Therefore, a Hubbell cement lined tank does not require a long dip tube extending all the way from the top to the bottom of the tank as is common in glass lined tanks.

How does my water heater ship?

All Hubbell storage type water heaters ship via common carrier and are classified by the Commodity Classification Standards Board under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. Each water heater is palletized and wood crated. All Hubbell tankless water heaters, when transported using common carrier, ship class 77.5. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the freight cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”. For very large shipments, the most economical method (LTL or Dedicated Truck) for transporting the water heaters to the final destination will be analyzed by Hubbell's transportation department.

Is Energy Star available for this model?

No. The Department of Energy does not include any indirect water heater in its Energy Star program. Boilers (the actual heat source for an indirect water heater) are rated by Energy Star. However, the Hubbell model T Transflow indirect water heater is the most efficient brand available, with a thermal efficiency rating of 98%. Federal Tax Code designates an indirect water heater as an accessory to a boiler. As such, the only circumstance in which an indirect water heater can be credited is when the unit is installed along with a new Energy Star- rated boiler. IN this instance, the homeowner may claim the value of the tank and cost of installation as part of the total boiler installation cost, and reflect this total on IRS Form 5695.

What is the R value of a Hubbell water heater?

Hubbell uses a blown-in polyurethane foam insulation for all cement lined water heaters and tanks up to 150 gallon capacity. This insulation has an R value of 7.2 per inch. Most Hubbell tanks have a minimum of 2 inches of insulation resulting in an R value of 14. Certain models are available either standard or as an option with 3 inch insulation and therefore have an R value of 21. Large storage water heater tanks over 150 gallon capacity and custom made stainless steel or alloy tanks have either 2" or 3" fiberglass insulation with an R value of 3.5 per inch.

Why Hubbell recommends 300 series versus duplex stainless steel?

While it is true that duplex stainless steel typically offers higher strength and resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion compared to austenitic (300 series) stainless steel, there are other factors that ultimately make it a less desirable choice compared to 300 series stainless steel. Duplex stainless steel makes up only 1% of the stainless steel market making it less readily available and higher cost especially in flanges, fittings and formed parts such as tank heads. While it is commonly stated that this added expense is offset by the ability to use material that is thinner due to the higher strength, this only applies to very large tanks where a reduction results in using a lower common plate thickness. As an example, a thickness reduction of 25% for a tank that is 3/16" thick in 300 series stainless steel still results in using the common 3/16" thick plate size in duplex stainless steel. The higher strength of duplex also has the negative result of decreased formability and machinability, adding cost to the fabrication and production process. In terms of welding, duplex stainless steel presents many problems in maintaining the proper two phase mixture which commonly leads to issues in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) such as loss of corrosion resistance, toughness, and post-weld cracking. This is true in all duplex stainless steel welding processes including TIG, MIG and Laser. By comparison the process of welding austenitic stainless steel is much more forgiving. The main weakness of austenitic stainless steel is its susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and chloride corrosion. Three factors that all must all be present cause this type of corrosion: elevated heat, the presence of chlorides, and residual stresses. In water heaters elevated heat and the presence of chlorides cannot be controlled. However, post-weld heat treating in a vacuum furnace followed by cooling in an inert atmosphere relieves the residual stresses in austenitic stainless steel tanks and therefore eliminates the susceptibility to this corrosion. For this reason, this post-weld heat procedure is performed on all Hubbell stainless steel tanks. The heat treating process is highly controlled and verifiable, unlike the difficult to control process of welding duplex stainless steel. Therefore, Hubbell offers stainless steel tanks fabricated from the 300 series (typically Type 304L or 316L) only, as this is a far more proven and verifiable material and fabrication process which will result in longer tank life. Of course, an alternative option is to specify the Hubbell cement lined steel tank which also provides a considerably longer life and is a more economical solution compared to duplex stainless steel and 300 series stainless steel.

Can my cement lined tank be damaged during installation and handling?

Although we don’t advocate dropping our tanks sometimes stuff happens. The Hubbell Hydrastone cement lining is a minimum of 1/2"thick (100 times thicker than a glass lined tank) and is guaranteed to uniformly cover 100% of all internal tank surfaces. Basically the Hubbell cement lining is a tank within a tank and should have no problem withstanding the rigors of shipping and installation. Although not necessry, you can specify an optional hand hole on our smaller tanks (150 gallon and under) to provide a means for inspection and repair. Water heaters with tanks larger than 36" generally include a 12" x 16" manway. In both cases, a Hubbell tank properly maintained will last decades.

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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Model V

What key information is required when sizing a heater?

Essential information is the temperature of the incoming cold water, desired exiting (hot) temperature and flow rate (GPM). The formula to determine the amount of kW the heater needs to be is as follows: GPM x °F Temp Rise x 0.1465 = kW required. For cyclical demands with predictable ON/OFF patterns it may be possible to reduce the kw from the above formula, please complete the sizing information in section 2-B of the sales brochure and consult your Hubbell Sales Engineer.

What voltages are available for the Hubbell heater?

Hubbell model V process water heaters are available in a wide range of kw ratings for the following voltages: 120v, 208v, 240v, 380v, 415v, 440v, 480v, 575v and 600v. Hubbell heaters are also available for nominal voltages (e.g. 220v, 230v, 460v etc…), please consult factory to determine the kw selection available for these voltages.

What is the typical lead time?

The Hubbell Model V process water heaters typically ships within 1-2 days after receipt of an order.

How does the heater ship?

All Hubbell model V6 6 gallon models ship via UPS. All Hubbell model V16 16 gallon models ship via common carrier under National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) class 100. To provide the lowest transportation cost, in most cases the shipment is made on Hubbell’s account and the shipping cost is added to the invoice, commonly referred to as “Pre pay and add”.

What standard accessories are included with the Hubbell heater?

All Hubbell model V process water heaters are supplied with the following accessories shipped loose: One (1) T&P relief valve, one (1)combo temperature and pressure gauge, two (2) dielectric unions and one (1) set of four 6" plastic legs.

What is step loading?

All Hubbell process water heaters (both the 6 gallon and the 16 gallon models) are controlled by an electronic temperature controller which provides step load operation for all models with more than one heating circuit. The Hubbell electronic controller operates each heating circuit independently, allowing each circuit to be energized as needed and non-simultaneously with another circuit. During periods of use, the first stage (i.e. circuit) heating elements will energize and if additional heating is required the second stage (circuit) will energize. In addition, the Hubbell electronic controller rotates the circuits and utilizes “first on first off” logic to equalize wear and tear on all circuits. This step loading, also referred to as staging, allows for reduced energy costs compared to a system that has all of its heating circuits controlled together in an all ON or all OFF manner.

How is the heater to be positioned when installed?

The Hubbell process water heater must be installed in a horizontal position, with the base parallel to the floor and the inlet connection at the lowest point. Ideally, the heater should be located as close as possible to the point of use to ensure timely delivery of hot water to your application.

What is the function of the low water cut-off?

The low water cut-off (LWCO) is a protective electronic device wired within the control circuit designed to shut off power to the heating elements in the event a low or insufficient water level is detected in the tank. This safety device prevents the elements from energizing and burning out in a low or no water condition. The LWCO is factory configured to automatically reset when the water level is safe, but can be field configured for manual reset if desired.

What size piping is required for the heater installations?

¾" piping.

Is 277 volt 3 phase voltage available for a water heater?

For all water heaters 277V is only an available option in 1PH, not 3PH. The 277V 1PH voltage is a derivation of your existing 480V 3Ph power. Where 480V is the line to line voltage on a 3 phase system and 277V is the voltage from any one of these lines to neutral, thus making the 277V power available in 1PH only.

Can my heater ship via UPS?

Yes. Hubbell packages and ships this model water heater via United Parcel Service (UPS).

Do Hubbell water heaters qualify as Low Lead?

Yes, all Hubbell water heater models qualify as meeting the low lead requirements of the “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” amendment to the “Safe Drinking Water Act” (SDWA) Section 1417(d) effective as of January 4, 2014. Hubbell certifies that its water heaters meet the following requirements of the SDWA and therefore are qualified and certified as Low Lead : (a)Hubbell water heater do not contain more than 0.2 percent lead with respect to solder and flux (b)Hubbell water heaters do not contain more than a weighted average of 0.25 percent lead with respect to all wetted surfaces of the water heater

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